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Founder of Girls Who Code to speak at RIT

The founder of the nonprofit Girls Who Code—Reshma Saujani—is slated to speak at Rochester Institute of Technology on Friday from 4 to 5 p.m. in the Ingle Auditorium.

Girls Who Code was launched to help increase the number of women in technology. The organization has reached some 40,000 young girls, in every state—90 percent of whom have declared or intend to declare a major or minor in computer science, the nonprofit said.

The event is free and open to the public.

Saujani will give a talk on “Closing the Gender Gap in Technology.”

She is the keynote speaker for the fifth annual ACM New York Celebration of Women in Computing Conference at RIT.  The conference runs through Saturday and was created to encourage women to complete their studies in computing by exploring careers and meeting female leaders from business, industry and academia.

“Women are underrepresented in the computing majors on most campuses and often do not get the opportunity to meet with and discuss technical topics with other groups of (mostly) women,” said Deb LaBelle, lecturer in RIT’s B. Thomas Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences and co-chair of the conference. “There is always something new to learn about and this conference offers a friendly environment for young women to celebrate the fact that they are ‘women in computing’ and they too have a lot to contribute to the world of computing.”

Follow Kerry Feltner on Twitter: @KerryFeltner

(c) 2017 Rochester Business Journal. To obtain permission to reprint this article, call 585-363-7269 or email madams@bridgetowermedia.com.

One comment

  1. I am proud of your success Reshma.

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