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WEEKEND BESTBETS
1 Food Network chef Alton Brown brings his “Eat Your Science” show Nov. 18 to the Rochester Auditorium Theatre. Brown’s shows include hosting “Iron Chef America” and “Good Eats.” Brown’s fresh ingredients include new puppets, comedy, songs and bigger experiments. ticketmaster.com

2 Disney Live! Mickey and Minnie’s Doorway to Magic brings 25 beloved Disney characters to the stage in a live magic show. Two shows will be staged Nov. 19 at Blue Cross Arena. Among the highlights are Cinderella, “Toy Story” stars, Snow White, Genie and others. ticketmaster.com

3Eastman Theatre transforms into a cirque wonderland as Cirque de la Symphonie returns to Rochester with a new show with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra Nov. 18 and 19 in Kodak Hall. The world’s greatest circus artists perform death-defying stunts and magical illusions with the full force of a live symphony orchestra. Ward Stare conducts. rpo.org

4The Hilton Sno-Flyers presents its 20th annual Rochester Snowmobile Show, a two-day show featuring snowmobiles, accessories, trailers and other winter leisure-themed exhibitors, on Nov. 19 and 20 at the Garden Factory in Gates. There will be informational seminars and safety courses, as well as wine and beer tastings. hiltonsnoflyers.com

5 Rochester Philharmonic Youth Orchestra opens its 46th season with a classical music concert Nov. 20 in the Hochstein Performance Hall. Some of the area’s most talented secondary school musicians will perform “From Wagner to Marquez,” with solo performances by Sarah Wager on bass and Chie Xu on violin. rpo.org

Holiday magic
Some things in life you can just count on. “The Nutcracker,” with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra and Rochester City Ballet, is one of them. The annual tradition, a favorite of Rochesterians, opens Nov. 23 for six performances in Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre. Bach Children’s Chorus joins the ballet and orchestra for the perennial favorite by Tchaikovsky. Performances continue Nov. 25 to 27. rpo.org

The mathematics of art
Dutch artist M.C. Escher is best known for his optical illusions: hands drawing themselves, fish morphing into birds. But over a five-decade career, Escher made much more: 448 lithographs, woodcuts and wood engravings and more than 2,000 drawings and sketches.

A new show at the Memorial Art Gallery contains 100 of Escher’s woodcuts, lithographs, mezzotints and drawings. “Reality and Illusion” includes early figure drawings, book illustrations, Italian landscapes and Escher’s head-tilting architectural drawings, such as staircases that go nowhere. The exhibition also includes tessellations, the repeating tile patterns for which he became famous.

Mathematician Doris Schattschneider will give a lecture Nov. 20. An alumna of the University of Rochester and Yale University, she is a retired Moravian College professor who writes about tessellations and Escher’s art.

Her 1990 book, “Visions of Symmetry,” still in print, is considered a classic by mathematicians and scientists.

The touring exhibition is the largest and most comprehensive retrospective of his work to be shown in the U.S. It’s on view through Jan. 29. mag.rochester.edu

Rooted and ready
Native American youth have stronger cultural roots and sense of purpose thanks to the revival of a ceremony to mark their transformation into adulthood.

Ohero:kon, a rites of passage ceremony, was reintroduced a decade ago by Mohawk Nation Bear Clan Mother Tewakierahkwa Louise McDonald Herne. Using a set of disciplined rituals, community elders help adolescents steer clear of drug use and other social ills by reconnecting to their indigenous roots. Participation has grown from seven young people to more than 90 each year.

In her documentary, “Ohero:kon—Under the Husk,” filmmaker Katsitsionni Fox of the Mohawk Nation tells the story of two young women who faced the challenges of the ceremony. Fox will present and discuss the film at Ganondagan State Historic Site at 2 p.m. Nov. 26.

For 20 weeks, Mohawk youth complete a rigorous curriculum in cultural instruction, empowerment, self-awareness, wilderness survival and tradition. The Ohero:kon program won high honors in 2015 from the Harvard Project on American Indian Economic Development. ganondagan.org

SHOPPING
Shopping for presents? Take a drive to Geneva.

Artists Kevin and Mary Schoonover will open their Greek Revival home for the fifth annual Flying Whale Studios & Friends holiday arts and crafts sale Nov. 25 to 27. You’ll find goods made by more than 30 artists and craftspeople who live in the region.

The sale has a reputation as a cozy and inviting place to browse and buy. Artists are bringing a new selection of jewelry, pottery, soaps, wearables and home accessories, along with local honey and maple syrup.

“I love being part of this show,” says Casey Wright of Peaches Products, who co-founded Mayday Underground, the Rochester indie art show and sale. “There’s such a great variety of high-quality artists represented.” flyingwhalestudios.com

The elves—er, artists—in the Folk Art Guild will bring creations to sell Nov. 25 to 27 during their annual Festival of Crafts at the Harley School.

The guild, located in the Finger Lakes town of Middlesex, Yates County, has been sharing crafts with the public for 55 years. Artists work in pottery, textiles, wood and paper. The event includes artists’ demonstrations and live music.

Among the handmade goods for sale: salad bowls and cutting boards made from local trees; woodfired ceramics such as glazed teapots and patterned leafware; ponchos, scarves and mittens; and silk jackets and tees. Dried flower and leaf note cards are made with plants grown in the guild’s gardens. Wooden toys, built by hand, are likely to last for generations. folkartguild.org

11/18/2016 (c) 2016 Rochester Business Journal. To obtain permission to reprint this article, call 585-546-8303 or email rbj@rbj.net.

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