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RIT engineering school gets nanotechnology grant

The microsystems engineering program in the Kate Gleason College of Engineering at Rochester Institute of Technology has been awarded a $550,000 grant for a nanotechnology project.
The grant comes from industry leader Sematech and allows RIT to work with both Sematech and the Research Foundation of SUNY at Albany. The partnership among the three organizations solidifies their working relationship in the growing semiconductor industry in New York, RIT officials said.
RIT has been involved in nanotechnology research and development for nearly 20 years, pioneering several lithographic processes used by the semiconductor industry today. The school led development of the immersion nanolithography used worldwide for the manufacture of state-of-the-art microchips.
The goal of the project is to support the extension of immersion nanolithography and semiconductor device processing solutions as far as possible and to alternative approaches to extend the roadmap as long as possible, said Bruce Smith, professor and director of the microsystems engineering Ph.D. program.

(c) 2009 Rochester Business Journal. Obtain permission to
reprint this article.

RIT engineering school gets nanotechnology grant

The microsystems engineering program in the Kate Gleason College of Engineering at Rochester Institute of Technology has been awarded a $550,000 grant for a nanotechnology project.

The grant comes from industry leader Sematech and allows RIT to work with both Sematech and the Research Foundation of SUNY at Albany. The partnership among the three organizations solidifies their working relationship in the growing semiconductor industry in New York, RIT officials said.

RIT has been involved in nanotechnology research and development for nearly 20 years, pioneering several lithographic processes used by the semiconductor industry today. The school led development of the immersion nanolithography used worldwide for the manufacture of state-of-the-art microchips.

The goal of the project is to support the extension of immersion nanolithography and semiconductor device processing solutions as far as possible and to alternative approaches to extend the roadmap as long as possible, said Bruce Smith, professor and director of the microsystems engineering Ph.D. program.

 

 

 

(c) 2009 Rochester Business Journal. Obtain permission to
reprint this article.

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