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Army depot’s civilian future in talks

Property transfer issues at the Seneca Army Depot in Romulus are the subject of ongoing talks by local economic developers; federal, state and local leaders; and members of the U.S. Army.
Joseph Whitaker, deputy assistant secretary of the Army, met Tuesday with Rep. Sherwood Boehlert, R-New Hartford; representatives of Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, D-N.Y., and state Sen. Michael Nozzolio, R-Fayette; and members of the Seneca County Industrial Development Agency.
The talks centered on the potential role the U.S. General Services Administration could play in assisting the Army and community in the transfer of ownership of property at the site from military to civilian.
The Army also provided the IDA representatives with a report on structural inspection of some 25 buildings at the facility, many of which are deemed structural hazards and will be demolished.
More discussions are expected.
The 10,600-acre site includes the Five Points Correctional Facility, the Advantage Group and a state police training center.
Also this month, Hillside Children’s Center of Rochester is expected to take over operations at the KidsPeace Seneca Woods campus, saving nearly 350 jobs.

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Army depot’s civilian future in talks

Property transfer issues at the Seneca Army Depot in Romulus are the subject of ongoing talks by local economic developers; federal, state and local leaders; and members of the U.S. Army.

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