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Ultralife gets $2.2 million battery order

Ultralife Batteries Inc. has received a $2.2 million order from the Department of Defense for its military battery. The order is another release under Ultralife’s Next Gen II small cylindrical battery contract.

Ultralife gets $2.2 million battery order

Ultralife Batteries Inc. has received a $2.2 million order from the Department of Defense for its military battery.
The order represents another release under Ultralife’s Next Gen II small cylindrical battery contract, company officials said. Deliveries are expected to begin by the end of 2005.
John Kavazanjian, Ultralife’s president and CEO, said the Newark-based company has been supplying this battery under a number of contracts for 10 years and has increased its production due to its sustained high demand.
“This latest order illustrates the strength of the overall demand for military batteries, since the BA-5372 is used in the same radio systems as our BA-5390 battery,” Kavazanjian said.
Next Gen II is the U.S. Army’s five-year battery procurement strategy. Its major objective is to establish and maintain a domestic production base of a sufficient capacity to timely meet peacetime demands and have the ability to surge quickly to meet deployment demands.
Ultralife’s BA-5372/U battery is used for memory backup primarily for a ground and airborne radio system and in applications including encryption and cryptographic devices, and the Patriot Missile System.

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