Home / Today's Top Stories / Kodak invests in technology firm

Kodak invests in technology firm

Eastman Kodak Co. has invested in another Silicon Valley technology firm and has expanded its West Coast venture capital operations. Kodak invested in San Jose-based YesVideo Inc., a leader in converting videotapes into CDs, DVDs and Web content. Under the terms of the agreement, the companies plan to develop new products for sale through Kodak’s distribution channel, take advantage of Kodak Picture CD and PhotoCD products to help merge digital photography and digital video applications, and integrate Kodak Internet photofinishing services in existing YesVideo products.

Kodak invests in technology firm

Eastman Kodak Co. has invested in another Silicon Valley technology firm and has expanded its West Coast venture capital operations.
Kodak invested in San Jose-based YesVideo Inc., a leader in converting videotapes into CDs, DVDs and Web content.
Under the terms of the agreement, the companies plan to develop new products for sale through Kodak’s distribution channel, take advantage of Kodak Picture CD and PhotoCD products to help merge digital photography and digital video applications, and integrate Kodak Internet photofinishing services in existing YesVideo products.
As part of the transaction, Kodak will receive an observer seat on the YesVideo board.
“YesVideo’s technology simplifies the process of converting standard video footage into CDs and DVDs,” said Ted Lewis, senior vice president and director of Digital Business Development. He also heads Kodak Venture Group.
YesVideo was founded in 1999. The amount of Kodak’s investment was not disclosed.
The Kodak Venture Group’s new headquarters in San Jose houses five employees from the Venture Group along with the Kodak’s developer relations team and members of its Systems Concept Center, part of the photo giant’s research and development organization.
Kodak Venture, created in October, has operations in San Jose, London and Rochester. Earlier this month it invested in DataPlay Inc., a Colorado-based developer of digital storage media for portable Internet appliances and consumer electronic devices.
Kodak appointed Lewis last fall to help it identify promising technology at other firms and convert Kodak’s research projects into new business. Lewis previously served as president of DaimlerChrysler Research & Technology N.A.

(c) 2001 Rochester Business Journal. Obtain permission to
reprint this article.

x

Check Also

yasaman-and-jalani-neurescence-cr

Neuroscience uses optical imaging to map the brain (access required)

For all of the advancements made in the world of neuroscience, the medical community's knowledge of the brain is still ...

UR scientist works on adding technical terms to sign language (access required)

  Lorne Farovitch, a graduate student at the University of Rochester, grew up deaf in a deaf family in Vancouver, ...