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International Business Resource Directory

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS CONTENTS

Foriegn markets’ share of sales on the rise,47
Boom in ‘job exports’ fails to occur,48
Legal disputes rarely heard in court,48
Southeast Asian economies facing challenge,49
Users weigh pros cons of machine translation,49
Europe retains luster despite EU’s difficulties,50
Genesee-Volkhov hits gold in Russian market,51
Smaller companies lead way in export growth,52
Economist sees more solid growth for exporters,53

Top 25 Area Exporters,54

Resources:
Accounting,55
Computer/Software Service,55
Consulting,55
Culture/Language Instruction,56
Customs Brokerage,56
Distribution,56
Educational Institutions,56
Export Management,57
Export Trading,57
Financial Serices,57
Foriegn Government Contracts,58
Freight Services,59
Government Agencies, Federal,59
Government Agencies, Local and State,60
Insurance,60
Legal Servivces,60
Market Research,61
Promotion,61
Real Estate Brokerage,61
Translation,61
Other Sources,62

International Business Resource Directory

Two decades ago, the now omnipresent bar codes had just started becoming commonplace in the United States.
Consumers and businesses are seeing a similar bar-coding revolution throughout Asia and Europe. Those bar-code-less, emerging international markets are fueling growth at PSC Inc., a bar-code-scanning equipment manufacturer based in Webster.
“We are seeing the same high-volume adoption across Europe,” says Stuart Itkin, vice president of worldwide marketing. Some 38 percent of PSC’s sales occur outside North America.
PSC is not alone.
As the Rochester economy becomes more global, local firms are seeing a rising percentage of their sales generated outside the United States.
Better than half of Eastman Kodak Co.’s sales now originate outside the United States. The same is true for Xerox Corp., and nearly so for Bausch & Lomb Inc.
“There are three ways to increase sales: export, export and export,” says Marca Bear, interim director of the center for business growth and assistant professor for international business at Rochester Institute of Technology.
Export sales from the Rochester metropolitan area have increased 46 percent since 1994, Bear says. Those sales generate an estimated $14 billion a year.
“Our exporting figures are booming,” she says. “I expect the trend to continue.”
Kodak chairman and CEO George Fisher has made international sales a priority and focused on entering more markets worldwide. The company leads local exporting and has operations in China, Japan and other countries in Asia as well as Europe, Africa, the Middle East, Latin America and Canada.
“The emerging markets are a focus area,” Kodak spokesman Paul Allen says. “A lot of growth is taking place there.”
Sales in the company’s Commercial Imaging segment last year grew 4 percent outside the United States, compared with a slight decline in this country.
Kodak reported sales outside the United States of $8.6 billion in 1996, or roughly 54 percent of the year’s total, compared with $7.4 billion at home. Five years ago, international business represented 48 percent of total sales.
Often, U.S. companies find huge untapped markets for existing product lines. Experts cite photography as an example where much of the developing world has never taken a photograph. Local companies such as Kodak and CPAC Inc. expect robust sales growth from those areas.
Perhaps no area holds as much promise for global expansion, experts say, as the opening telecommunications market. ACC Corp. and Frontier Corp. both have operations in the United Kingdom. ACC is growing in Canada and evaluating Germany as its next market. In addition, telecom-products manufacturers such as Moscom Corp., Performance Telecom Corp. and Northern Telecom Ltd. see lucrative markets supplying those global competitors.
The Pittsford-based Moscom ranks among the local companies that have seen the biggest shifts in overseas sales. The company’s foreign sales went from 16 percent of total sales in 1992 to 31 percent in 1996. Sales outside the United States fueled much of the company’s growth.
“In telecommunications, there are several global players we see as ideal distributors of our products,” says Robert Boxer, vice president and corporate counsel for Moscom. “Often, (telecommunications companies) look for global players; they don’t want to deal with individual companies.”
International sales give companies whose products require large amounts of investment to design and manufacture a chance to increase the return on research- and-development costs, he notes.
Moscom designs, manufactures and services telecommunications-management, voice-processing and voice-recognition products.
“Our products require a tremendous investment,” Boxer says. Selling those products internationally allows Moscom to profit from economies of scale.
PSC’s Itkin agrees that international markets give companies great opportunities to expand sales of existing products without the cost of additional research, design and development.
“It significantly increases the opportunities available for existing products,” he says. “As our volume increases, we have more favorable costs and expand our base.”
PSC officials expect Asia to become the next big market for its scanning products.
“It is a function of infrastructure,” Itkin explains, noting that as countries build their computer, technical and electronics infrastructure, bar coding becomes attractive and possible.
Most of Moscom’s international sales have taken place in Europe. Investments in Latin American markets have not borne fruit yet, company officials say.
“We expect our international sales to continue to grow,” Boxer says. “It is market-driven, but we see it going to 50 percent (of total sales).”
Similarly, Itkin says, PSC’s foreign sales doubled from 1992 to 1996, and the company expects ultimately to reach 50 percent of total sales outside the United States.
Company officials and experts warn, however, that exporting is not as easy as plopping a gizmo in a box and shipping it to the Pacific Rim.
Moscom’s Boxer says cost is the biggest negative for overseas sales. It requires additional sales and support staff. And the company must ensure its products comply with international standards.
Itkin says selling products overseas requires addressing technical issues such as compatibility with foreign systems and compliance with other countries’ codes and regulations.
Some companies such as Kodak, Xerox and Detection Systems Inc. build manufacturing facilities overseas. Kodak, for example, has facilities in Ireland, Mexico and other countries. Xerox, through Rank Xerox Ltd., Fuji Xerox Co. Ltd. and similar affiliates, operates internationally. Kodak plans to invest some $140 million in plant expansion in Ireland and Mexico. It expects to boost revenues by putting manufacturing centers closer to its non-domestic market.
Part of the reason for building overseas is that firms get better deals on taxes and tariffs if they use local content. For example, PSC expects to improve profitability by shipping scanning-equipment kits, rather than the finished products, overseas. The company still will manufacture the products in Webster, but use foreign labor to assemble them.
“It increases the foreign content and reduces the taxes (the company has to pay),” Itkin notes.
Those sales still create manufacturing jobs here.
RIT’s Bear expects the percentage of sales overseas to continue growing as the world market expands.
“There are lots of export-ready (local) firms,” she says. “The community has done a lot of things to expand exporting.”
One key reason to continue growing exporting is it creates jobs, Bear adds. She estimates one in four jobs locally relates directly to exporting, and one report puts the tally at 30,000 jobs for every $1 billion in exports.
“As trade relations improve with China, the Middle East and Latin America, opportunities abound and they are not industry-specific,” she says.
“It is not something that will stop.”
Companies that ignore exporting opportunities will lose competitive advantages.
Beyond the bottom line, Boxer says, an international sales focus can give a company more opportunities here as well.
“When you are dealing with other markets, you get new product ideas.”

International Business Resource Directory

When the North American Free Trade Agreement and other recent trade pacts meant to increase exports went into effect, some observers worried that domestic jobs would be lost to foreign countries that do not pay or treat their employees as well as the United States does.
Some low-tech manufacturers such as clothing companies have shifted jobs to countries with a lower standard of living, but it is debatable whether there is a cause-and-effect relationship in terms of the trade pacts, says Glenn MacDonald, an economics and management professor at the William E. Simon Graduate School of Business Administration.
“I think the big worry … has not been borne out,” he says. “The wages are low, but you generally get what you pay for.”
Thomas Hendrickson, president and CEO of CPAC Inc. in Leicester, says he strongly agrees.
CPAC owns the Fuller Brush Co. Many competitors whose products are priced much lower than Fuller Brush’s have increased manufacturing in countries such as Taiwan, Thailand and Vietnam, he said. Those products are sold mainly in discount stores.
“That isn’t our market,” he says. “Our products are guaranteed for life.”
CPAC is one of the Rochester area’s top exporters. It does have overseas operations for its chemical business. Seven percent of its 370 employees work outside the United States. Five years ago, before the Fuller Brush acquisition, that portion was 21 percent.
A survey of 13 of the area’s top exporters shows that many do not have a big overseas staff. However, the larger ones do. Xerox Corp. has 47 percent of its employees working in overseas operations, up from 45 percent five years ago.
Eastman Kodak Co.’s percentage of employees outside the United States has increased from 42 percent to 44 percent. Bausch & Lomb Inc. now employs 39 percent of its employees outside the United States, compared with 35 percent five years ago.
Moscom Corp.’s foreign employment has increased from 8 percent to 10 percent over the last five years.
However, some of the smaller firms such as Helios Research Corp., which makes thermodynamic pumps, and Liberty Pumps Inc. both have increased their sales outside the United States but kept all jobs in the United States.
Burleigh Instruments Inc.’s employees all are U.S.-based, says Michael Cook, director of international operations. Five years ago, 12 percent worked in overseas operations.
The firm’s office in Germany was closed in 1995. At the beginning of this year, the company closed its England sales office and relocated those employees to the Rochester operation.
“It was mainly a cost function,” he says. “The cost and risk was quite high, and you just can’t justify the return.”
Plus, technology makes communications with overseas customers easier, he notes.
Cook said he is not sure how much trade pacts meant to open borders have affected business. It is easier to gain access to markets than was the case five to 10 years ago, he says.
Bausch & Lomb has expanded its manufacturing operations in many markets, including China. Daryl Dickson, senior vice president of human resources, says the expansion is driven purely to gain market share and cut export costs.
CPAC, too, is expanding operations in Belgium and Italy by 50 percent, and also looking at Asian markets because of the growth of sales in those regions, Hendrickson says.
In contrast, the company closed its South American operations in 1995 because they were not cost-effective, he notes.
“Expanding sales globally tends to generate foreign employment,” says MacDonald of the Simon School. “That doesn’t necessarily mean that they’re shifting employment. They may be adding it or adjusting different operations.”
The need for close proximity to high-sales regions varies depending on the product, he adds. Generally, the larger the product, the more expensive it is to ship, thus causing the need for a foreign manufacturing operation or partner.
Says MacDonald: “That’s why you see so many Japanese cars made in the U.S.”

International Business Resource Directory

Have the Asian tigers lost their roar?
That is the question imbedded in most headlines these days on the dramatic slowdown in Southeast Asian economies.
True, some of Southeast Asia’s economies–which include Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam–have experienced stunning booms in the past decade or more.
Thailand doubled its gross domestic product over five years. And U.S. exports to the region, including Brunei, grew by 125 percent–from $16 billion to $36 billion–in the half decade ending in 1994, according to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.
Many of the Southeast Asian countries got a jump start when the Japanese yen doubled in the mid-1980s and high wages drove Japan’s technology-based companies to seek cheaper shores of production. Hence, a surge in foreign investments fueled double-digit growth for countries like Thailand and Malaysia.
But a host of deep-rooted problems– including overbuilding, escalating costs, corruption, inferior infrastructure, poor capital markets–have caught up with the region’s economies.
The real test is looming, observers say. Many fair-weather friends doubt whether Southeast Asian countries have the means or muscle for the real economic reform needed to sustain growth.
But Rochester exporters–perhaps because they are used to gloomy weather –are still waving Asian banners and patiently waiting for the storm to settle.
“I don’t think this is short-lived success,” says Michael Vang, director of Asia/Pacific sales operations at Genencor International Inc. “As you grow you reach a new plateau; I don’t think you’ll see it slip back.
“(These countries) will sustain (their current) levels, but it will not be the mountain of economic growth (of the past).”
One of the world’s largest manufacturers of industrial enzymes for commercial applications, Genencor plans to open a regional sales office in Singapore in May. The privately held biotechnology firm’s Asian business makes up 10 percent to 15 percent of total sales, Vang says.
With the second-largest port in the world, Singapore’s clean, safe and English-speaking city attracts many multinationals. It also is less expensive than Hong Kong, Toyko and Shanghai, China, Vang notes.
Even with projections of slower growth, many exporters are eager to tap the increasing disposable incomes of some 400 million Southeast Asians. According to some estimates, the region’s head count may reach 600 million by the year 2010.
“When you look at the population in some of these areas, a small change in population dynamics could result in huge opportunities in (sales) growth rate,” says Vang, whose company’s enzymes are used to manufacture everyday goods such as laundry detergent, sweetener in Coca-Cola and stone-washed jeans.
Beyond its sheer numbers, this burgeoning middle class exhibits a strong materialistic streak.
“They have a developing taste for Western products,” says Douglas Kahle of Canandaigua Wine Co. Inc.
Kahle, vice president of the wine company’s International Division, says Southeast Asia accounts for roughly 5 percent of its $30 million annual international sales. The company’s exports to its biggest market in the region, Thailand, grew 430 percent in the past three years. Kahle is bullish on the market’s prospects–in the long run.
“Southeast Asia is still in its embryonic stage,” he says. “Most of those economies are somewhat fragile.
“You’ve got to ride out the bumps through the early development stages,” he adds.
That’s why Kahle is not dismayed by Thailand’s devaluating bhat and plummeting stock-market index. In 1995 the Thai market was at 1,400; now it is hovering around 700.
With no manufacturing facilities in Southeast Asia, Canandaigua Wine’s investments in the region represent little risk and high potential gain.
“We want to have a presence there, so when the next Thailand explodes we can profit from that,” Kahle says.
Southeast Asian governments are recognizing that to reignite the boom, improvements in education and infrastructure are needed. They also have taken steps to eliminate trade barriers.
The Asian Free Trade Agreement was adopted by the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) to open their doors more widely to the flow of goods, investment and technology.
“Politicians recognize their security lies in their economic growth and being able to feed their people,” Kahle observes.
However, some observers say Southeast Asian governments–many of which are new to democracy and liberal trade policies–have a long way to go in fostering entrepreneurial spirit and in getting rid of cronyism. Corruption still plagues many of these countries.
Political instability is one of the biggest risks for Western businesses entering the region. Rising incomes can both quell unrest and stir it up. The latest uprisings in Indonesia by Muslims have been blamed on unfair distribution of wealth within the country.
Underdeveloped roads, buildings and ports are another problem. For the more developed countries, like Malaysia, economic growth has outpaced infrastructure development. At the other end of the spectrum, markets such as Vietnam’s still are building a foundation for growth.
This need presents an opportunity for companies like General Railway Signal Corp. George Street, vice president of international operations, says his firm has some $30 million worth of contracts in Indonesia, and a sales office in Malaysia.
A lack of public financing and managerial resources is prompting many countries to deregulate and privatize telecommunications and water utilities.
Street warns, however, that financing projects can prove difficult.
“You’ve got to be creative with the financing,” he says.
Also critically important: Picking the right agent.
“That partnership is the heart of the business,” Street says.
Entering the information age, where knowledge-intensive industries provide the greatest potential for economic growth, has become difficult for some countries–especially those, like Malaysia, that in the past have been known for labor-intensive, low-tech assembly operations. Consequently, underskilled labor and poor school systems in some countries hinders their development. But Linda Maslona, director of international marketing for Ward’s Natural Science Establishment Inc., says that “especially in Indonesia, Singapore and Thailand there is a very big initiative in place to educate the people. And there’s the money to do it.”
Despite these caveats, most exporters agree the Southeast Asian markets are relatively easy to enter. Maslona notes that trade agreements between the United States and ASEAN countries reduce the tariffs of goods going into the region.
The U.S. Chamber of Commerce promotes Southeast Asia as one of the biggest BEMs–big emerging markets–for U.S. companies.
And because all countries, with the exception of Thailand, carry a history of Western colonization, their cultures are very trade-oriented with English being the primary language for business.
Continued growth of these countries presents opportunity for their people and Western businesses alike.

International Business Resource Directory

On the far side of the Big Pond, the fish are biting.
The 15 nations that make up the European Union share an $8.6 trillion economy, larger than the one forged by the North American Free Trade Agreement. Its 320 million residents represent one-third of the world market. Save for textiles and automobiles, it is one of the most open markets in the world; tariffs are low, averaging 3 percent. And while it is experiencing slower growth than Asian markets, last year alone the European market expanded by some $220 billion.
If that does not reel you in, chew on this: Nearly $130 billion in U.S. goods were exported to Europe in 1996.
Translation: one bloomin’ huge market for American companies.
“We have a joke in the office that the European market grows at the rate of one Taiwan a year,” says Frank Vargo, deputy assistant secretary for Europe in the Department of Commerce. “If a company is not doing business in Europe, it’s missing the world’s largest market.”
Now, the bad news:
While the European Union may be alive, it is not necessarily well.
Now in its sixth year, the EU remains tangled in a web of high unemployment, debilitating inflation, and a history of social contracts that contribute to steep labor costs, layoffs and frequent strikes.
“People are hurting everywhere, and they’re hurting really good,” says Barbara Jankar, professor of political science at SUNY College at Brockport.
At 2 percent to 2.3 percent, economic growth in the European Union is slower than experts had hoped and is too low to keep unemployment from continuing the rise it began in the late 1970s. Today, the region’s jobless rate hovers at 11 percent.
“If (the EU) is going to tighten up the economy, they can’t hang on to their individual social safety nets–they’ll have to work together,” Jankar says.
“Can they resolve their problems and bring national economies under control and move forward as a more or less united economy in the 21st century? The jury is certainly undecided. They’re discussing it.”
These days the turmoil centers on a reluctance by member nations to unify their currencies into a single European monetary unit.
The Treaty on European Union (more commonly known as the Maastricht Treaty), negotiated in 1991, paved the way for monetary and political union among the then 12 European nations. This new Europe, launched in 1992, would have a joint currency, as well as common foreign and security policies.
But the leading economic powerhouse, Germany, cannot meet the stringent fiscal regulations set forth by the treaty, which stipulated that debt could be only 3 percent of gross domestic product.
“When the Berlin Wall came down, the cost was horrendous,” Jankar explains. “It was like pouring millions of marks down a black hole.”
On paper, Germany is making its debt register below 3 percent. In fact, most countries in the EU probably will not meet the standards, Jankar predicts. The lone exception is tiny Luxembourg.
Indeed, on paper the European Union appears focused and primed. Its governing apparatus has been erected. The European Council, composed of representatives from each country, wields the most power and gives mandates to the European Committee, an administrative arm. Other branches include the relatively powerless European Parliament, whose influence is growing, and the European Court of Justice, whose rulings apply to all member states.
The nuances of national allegiance, however, have slowed the machinery of unification.
“These are 15 countries all concerned about sovereignty, but they have to work together,” Vargo says.
The Maastricht Treaty’s call for a single currency strikes at the heart of each nation’s independence. Member states have wrestled with the notion for more than five years but still have not agreed how to make it work. A Jan. 1, 1999, deadline looms.
The market, banks and business are prepared to deal with the temporary bangs and bumps of a start-up currency, Jankar says. But if a common monetary unit is delayed with no concrete plan in place, she predicts, “the market goes, “Whoa!,’ and they’ll stay away from the weaker economies, like Spain and Italy.”
If the market is prepared for a common currency, it will be quiet, Jankar notes. But if uncertainty is the name of the game, companies will continue to look to do business with individual countries rather than the region as a whole.
“Right now all the European currencies are hitched together in a system which permits all currencies to vary by a certain amount,” Jankar says. “The stronger currencies, such as the mark and the Dutch guilder, vary less. Weaker currencies, such as Italy’s lira and Spain’s peso, vary more.”
Italy’s economic and political problems have stretched its currency beyond reasonable limits. These days, 1,000 lira equal one mark, which is fine, Jankar says, “if you’re investing marks in Italy, but a losing proposition if it goes the other way.”
A common currency must be established in order for the EU to pursue a single economic policy, Vargo says.”That will impart an economic discipline.”
Not surprisingly, public opinion on the idea varies widely among member nations. A Gallup Poll conducted in December found a widening split among Europeans. Only a quarter of Britons favor a single currency, compared with more than 60 percent of voters in France and more than 70 percent of Italians. Only 16 percent of Germans think their country would be better off in 10 or 20 years as a result of a single currency; 31 percent think it would be worse off.
But corporate Europe sees things differently.
“The cost of changing that money is big business for banks, but (foreign exchange is) a losing proposition for companies, particularly because it varies every day,” Jankar says. “Europe is very slow to come together. With a common currency, it’s more serious. It forces some fiscal discipline on the countries, and that’s excellent for companies.”
On a recent overseas trip, Jankar sent her students off on the train with $5 and told them to change it into local currency each time they entered a new country. The students passed through Belgium, France, Germany and other countries, and by the time they returned to France, their $5 had been gobbled up by currency-exchange fees.
“When you get a single currency, the transaction costs will fall significantly,” Vargo says. “You won’t have to convert your money from francs to lira to pounds.”
None of this has stopped a Yankee invasion. American companies have found homes for their products all across Europe.
The United Kingdom is the most common destination for American goods. One of every four dollars exported to the EU, 24 percent, lands in Great Britain, Vargo says. Yet Great Britain represents only 14 percent of all the EU’s gross domestic product, leaving the rest of the EU a vast, undertapped market for American companies.
The reason is simple: In Great Britain, language and culture are not the barriers that they are in Germany, France, Austria, the Netherlands and elsewhere.
LaserMax Inc. stepped into non- English markets through distributors some five years ago. The small firm cannot finance frequent overseas visits, but its commercial accounts manager, Robert Beaton, has made the trip several times. He found his friendly, handshaking sales approach did not mesh with the formal business style of Germans and Austrians. Working through a distributor or representative who lives in the area, he says, eliminates misunderstandings.
Hometown companies seem to have found similar routes to foreign soil.
Rochester firms in 1995 exported $343.4 million in merchandise to the United Kingdom, compared with $238.9 million to Germany, $222.3 million to France and $121.1 million to the Netherlands, for a total of approximately $925.7 million, according to U.S. Census Bureau statistics. (The Census Bureau does not track exports to the region as a whole.) By comparison, Rochester merchandise exports to all foreign countries totaled $3.8 billion in 1995.
Companies that pursue business in non-English-speaking Europe are likely to find hungry markets; Germany’s economy alone is twice as big as that of Great Britain, Vargo says. To make things easier, trade-oriented firms, such as market research companies, increasingly operate on an EU-wide basis.
American businesses that sell through a representative and do not have manufacturing facilities in Europe are more concerned about the strength of the dollar than about creation of a single currency. Competition from local rivals in the EU proves daunting as well, says Martin Roberts, manager of a JML Optical Industries Inc. division.
Some six years ago, JML contacted the U.S. Embassy in Washington, D.C., for tips on manufacturer’s reps in Europe. Roberts, who manages the JML Direct Optics Division, says embassy officials took the company catalog and brochure and, for a fee, represented the firm at trade fairs overseas.
The company further narrowed its focus by talking to others in related fields who already were exporting.
Today, JML, which makes precision optical systems, has reps in Germany, France, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands and Spain.
Small companies like LaserMax often get their feet wet during trade fairs. Numerous Commerce Department programs also are available to help English- speaking firms do business in Europe.
Despite golden business opportunities throughout the EU and plentiful help in getting there, Vargo maintains, American business still views the union as a willy-nilly assortment of individual markets–rather than as a single destination for American goods and services.
“The wheels of change grind very, very slowly,” Jankar says. “Nobody can make a decision because the thing is so unwieldy.”
But a perfect time to test the waters may never come, Vargo says. Five years after EC ’92 was formed, export opportunities have never been better.
Beaton says LaserMax sales overseas are increasing this year after a flat 1996. While he attributes some of the boost to a stronger dollar, he believes the company’s product, an internal laser sight for semiautomatic handguns, is starting to gain acceptance in foreign militaries and police organizations, and word is spreading.
The company’s overseas business, which includes Europe, accounted for only some $700,000 of the company’s $4.2 million in sales last year. Beaton aims to increase overall commercial sales 20 percent every year and to continue a dogged pursuit of the European market.
“You can’t give up on the market over there,” says Beaton, who devotes half his time to priming international commercial accounts. “You just have to develop it, and it takes a lot of work.”
Adds Vargo: “I’ve never had an instance of a company wanting to sell in Europe who couldn’t. Nobody can afford not to be in the European market.”
(Sally Parker is a Rochester-area free- lance writer.)

International Business Resource Directory

The Genesee-Volkhov Connection Inc. expected profit eventually after opening shop in Novgorod, Russia, three years ago. But it didn’t expect the Russian world of photography to be such a hit.
“There’s a huge market exploding in Russia,” says Eugene Avallone, Genesee-Volkhov’s vice chairman for technical affairs, and co-owner of Park Avenue Photo Inc.
Genesee-Volkhov was founded in collaboration with Novgorod, Rochester’s Russian sister city, when, in 1993, the mayor of Novgorod challenged Rochesterians to start a business in Russia.
Its first venture has targeted that booming photography market. Organizers hope to explore other opportunities as well.
Genesee-Volkhov’s mission regarding the photography business is “to provide innovative, practical and top-quality products and services that meet the needs of amateur and professional photographers in Russia.”
Bringing state-of-the-art equipment to Russia is something the business prides itself on.
Avallone is in charge of finding and acquiring good used equipment. “I go over (to Novgorod) once a year to order parts, fix (machines) and take inventory on equipment,” he says.
“I thought we would have one shop,” says Richard Fitts, chairman and CEO of Genesee-Volkhov. But Genesee-Volkhov now boasts six photo labs and five sales areas, and is expanding east of Moscow into the Volga River Basin near Cheboksary.
Its board of directors just signed a dealer agreement with Eastman Kodak Co. in Russia–known as Kodak AO–to become one of only 20 dealers of photographic equipment in the entire Russian federation. Genesee-Volkhov can now obtain merchandise at a greater discount, and can distribute equipment and products to other photo shops in the country.
Fitts says Genesee-Volkhov is looking into purchasing a warehouse and trucks to allow the business to be a wholesaler.
Fitts, a Kodak retiree, formed the board of directors of Genesee-Volkhov. Avallone became involved because of his knowledge of Russian marketing and business. His expertise in photofinishing brought an added bonus to the board.
Novgorod was open to the idea of American-based business in its country, Fitts says.
“Russians have realized that if they’re going to succeed, they need to bring in foreign capital,” he says. But they do not want a handout–they want to work at the business’ success, too.
Genesee-Volkhov is operated by Russian employees and a Russian general manager, president and chief operating officer, Fitts says.
In deciding which business to get into, Fitts saw photography as an untapped market. He took the leadership of Genesee-Volkhov after his role ended as president of Linkages, the organization that ties Novgorod and Rochester together as sister cities. Fitts had been in contact with a photographer in Novgorod who explained the long-standing need for quality photographic equipment in Russia.
The Russian landscape is so vast that populations of people are spread out, Fitts says. The distance a person in Novgorod would have to travel to get film developed is roughly equivalent to the distance between Rochester and Utica.
Fitts admits he lacked confidence in the business’s chance for success.
Finding investors for the business to get started was difficult because area businesses were not ready to make a high-risk investment.
Most of the shareholders are not typical investors, Fitts says. Some 90,000 shares were sold to 121 stockholders at $5 a share by June 1996. To keep costs low, a broker was not used.
The investors have a sincere interest in the sister city relations and in seeing Novgorod succeed in business.
“We call them investors of the heart,” Fitts says. The investors were secured through informal meetings, publicity, and the occasional wine-and-cheese party.
Genesee-Volkhov opened its first photo shop after coming to an agreement with Kodak Ltd., which markets Kodak in Eastern Europe. A Kodak Express outlet was opened with the agreement that Kodak products be used for film developing, that Kodak assist with marketing and advertising, and that it have free reign to monitor quality of the shop with open inspections.
In return, Genesee-Volkhov gets discount prices on the materials it purchases from Kodak.
Once investors were found, the friendly relations between Novgorod and Rochester–from years of teacher and student exchanges, and pen-pal relationships–allowed for the quick and relatively easy start-up of the business.
Rochester has had good relations with the Novgorod city administration for a number of years. The photography business was formed out of the sister city relationship the two cities share, and with the assistance of Buffalo and its sister city, Tver.
Buffalo introduced the Genesee-Volkhov board of directors to the deputy mayor of Tver, who assisted the board with interpreting local laws dealing with business excursions.
Although revenue has increased significantly for Genesee-Volkhov–from $500,000 in 1995 to $1.6 million in 1996–Fitts explains that most profit is being reinvested to expand sites and purchase equipment.
Genesee-Volkhov shareholders are not likely, in the near future, to see any dividends on their investment, because Genesee-Volkhov’s board feels it is more important to continue growing the company.
Novgorod is a wonderful city in which to start a business, Fitts says. Founded in 859, it is an ancient city whose name actually means new (nov) town (gorod). Its size is similar to Rochester, and it is located between Moscow and St. Petersburg, providing access to larger markets.
“The competition is expanding,” Avallone says. “(Kodak Express) used to be the only photo lab in a city of 250,000.”
Luckily for Genesee-Volkhov, the market has not yet reached the saturation point. Russia is three times the size of the United States with a 33 percent smaller population, so nothing is very close, Avallone adds.
Cities are still far away from each other, and one lab is still supporting a large area.
(Michele Spilberg is an intern at the Rochester Business Journal.)

International Business Resource Directory

The Greater Rochester area is very fortunate to have companies such as Eastman Kodak Co., Xerox Corp., Bausch & Lomb Inc., Gleason Corp., Harris Corp. R.F. Communications Division, ITT Automotive Electrical Systems Inc. North America, Delphi Energy and Engine Management Systems, General Railway Signal Corp., Garlock Inc., Goulds Pumps Inc. and so on. These companies employ tens of thousands of people and account for billions of dollars worth of regional exports. They are, however, only a part of the story.
According to the 1996 year-end survey of the Greater Rochester Metro Chamber of Commerce Inc.’s International Business Council, Rochester’s top 60 exporting firms accounted for $5.6 billion worth of exports. This is a huge amount of business, but people seem to overlook the fact that an additional 3,900 firms also export products and services from our region. Surprisingly, these smaller companies not only account for most of our region’s export growth, but their total export figures actually exceed the total volume generated by our 60 largest exporters.
As of mid-March, with more than 620 companies reporting their figures, Rochester regional exports totaled $8 billion. This is a very impressive figure, but remember that more than 3,000 other exporting companies have yet to report their figures.
It is this group of smaller exporters, usually employing fewer than 200 people each, which has helped to increase Rochester’s exports at an annual rate of nearly 10 percent during each of the past 14 years. In 1983, for example, this region accounted for $5.36 billion worth of exported goods and services. Now, regional exports total an estimated $14 billion.
With more than 88 percent of the region’s exporters reporting “increased” or “significantly increased” exports over 1995 figures, we think that the local international business community is stronger now than it has ever been and we are proud to state that Rochester-made products now can be found in more that 160 countries around the world.
The key factor in this remarkable export growth has been the large number of regional firms that offer “world-class” products. Most of these firms are smaller employers and can be classified as either “emerging exporters” or “first-time exporters.”
Companies classified as “emerging exporters” make up approximately 80 percent of IBC member firms. Their products are made to the highest quality standards and are offered at fair prices by executives who understand how to market these products to customers throughout the world.
Emerging exporters typically begin to offer their products in a small number of countries, but within a few years they find themselves exporting to customers in 25 to 30 additional nations.
This same geometric export growth can be seen among our “first-time exporters.”
First-time exporters developed in our region during the past six years total approximately 330 companies. These exporters have been developed through grants, supplied by Empire State Development, which have allowed representatives from the International Business Council to assist regional firms with export potential.
Taken together, these emerging and first-time exporters have accounted for more than four-fifths of the region’s total export growth during the past 12 years. Additionally, when some of our larger firms have had to reduce their work forces, many of these highly skilled and experienced workers have been hired by emerging and first-time exporters. When this happens, these people bring their knowledge and skills to companies in desperate need of employees with these skills. In this way, regional downsizing actually has helped many of our emerging exporting firms to secure key people and achieve greater exporting success in much shorter periods of time than they would have otherwise.
Another reason why Rochester has had so much success in export markets is our highly skilled labor force.
Rochester-area workers not only have the ability to manufacture products to the highest quality standards, but they also manufacture these products at world-class productivity rates. (A study done several years ago indicated that Rochester-area manufacturing workers produced more than $140,000 in value added per manufacturing employee.) Also, our area offers a very reliable and stable work force, which hardly ever experiences work stoppages.
Another major factor in Rochester’s exporting success has been a willingness to share international business knowledge.
The International Business Council offers its members 15 to 18 educational seminars per year. Through these programs, a great deal of international business information is disseminated to regional companies that otherwise might not be able to secure this up-to-the-minute data. With more than 2,100 members, the council draws expertise from its members and allows only people who are “practitioners” to speak at its programs. These educational programs are always offered at nominal cost–so that smaller companies can afford to send their key personnel–and are compressed into half-day programs so that they are “attendable” by representatives who must also supervise their employees.
All IBC programs are presented in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Commerce and Empire State Development, bringing the resources of all three organizations to IBC educational programs.
Still another reason why our region has had such remarkable success is an awareness of international business opportunities. We’ve had so many successful exporting firms in our region that nobody wants to be left out. Also, improved communications, and especially the emergence of the fax machine, have made it possible for even the most rural company to be a “player” in the international marketplace.
With all of this exporting activity taking place in our region, why do the Commerce Department figures credit Rochester with only $3.2 billion worth of exports for 1995? One reason is that these figures do not include the secondary export-service figures generated by bankers, lawyers, accountants, freight forwarders and others who benefit significantly from our concentration of international business.
In addition, the Commerce Department figures count only a fraction of the total international business activity taking place in the Greater Rochester area. The department’s figures include statistics from only five counties, while our figures come from nine adjacent counties. What’s more, the department’s figures take into consideration only export sales declarations for products actually shipped from the immediate Rochester area; our figures include all products and services manufactured in our region for overseas markets.
According to the Commerce Department report, if a Rochester-area firm distributes its exports to Latin America via a distribution center in Miami or San Antonio, the Rochester-made exports are actually credited to the city making the final shipment.
Also, according to the department report, if a company is headquartered in another state but makes its products here, the export sales figures are credited to the home office location–not to the Rochester area, where the products actually are manufactured for foreign markets.
Many Rochester-area companies make components and subassemblies that are assembled into finished products elsewhere prior to being shipped overseas. Although these components and subassemblies are manufactured to metric standards and have different electrical requirements than products manufactured for U.S. markets, these export sales are almost always credited to the city where the final assembly takes place.
Additionally, Commerce Department figures make no allowances for exported services. There are many Rochester-area firms that not only manufacture products, but also supply software and control systems to operate this equipment. None of these service export figures are included in the Commerce Department figures.
To summarize, the year-end survey done by the International Business Council reflects the totals of products and services manufactured and provided by companies in our nine-county region for overseas customers. Whether you agree with our estimates or not, companies from the Greater Rochester area now export to more than 160 countries around the world and international business is, without question, the key economic component of our regional economy.
Exporting and international business opportunities will continue to grow in our region as a result of global and regional trade agreements, including pacts that will make Latin American markets much more accessible in the next few years.
International business already dominates our regional economy, and we feel that it will become significantly more important within the next 10 years. World-trade-agreement provisions will reduce both import and export duties on almost all products by 33 percent during the next few years and, with one job in every four in our region now dependent upon international business–one of every three, if you include related international services–think of the number of jobs that will be created by this agreement alone.
Rochester’s international business community will expand at an even faster pace than it has during the past decade. Be sure that you and your company are a part of it.

International Business Resource Directory

By ROGER SHIELDS
(Roger Shields, a noted international economist with Chase Manhattan Bank N.A., sees another year of solid export growth for the nine-county Greater Rochester region. In a January speech to members of the International Business Council, he surveyed the international business scene and pinpointed particularly strong trading opportunities for Rochester-area exporters. The following are highlights from his speech:)
A major trading region that continues to outperform all others is the Pacific Rim. With the exception of Japan, which had another disappointing year in 1996, the Pacific Rim nations have continued their economic expansion. China, with an economic growth rate of 9 percent (down from 12 percent in the previous year), is still the dominant market in the entire region.
Unfortunately for its Asian neighbors, China exports profusely, but imports very little from other Asian nations. This trading pattern generates large negative trade balances with China’s neighbors.
With a foreign investment rate second only to the United States, China is the key player in the region and its assimilation of Hong Kong should be a true “non-event” this July.
Other Asian countries doing well include Korea; Thailand; Malaysia (where the world’s two tallest buildings have recently been erected); Singapore (now one of the most expensive places in the world to do business); the Philippines; Indonesia; and Taiwan. All of these countries will have economic growth rates of 7 percent to 8 percent in the coming year, and the entire region should again be the strongest trading area in the world for Rochester- area exporters.
Another very strong market near this region is India. Political and economic reforms have made this countryfar more attractive to Western businessmen and, with its huge middle class, India will continue to offer outstanding trading opportunities in 1997.
Other countries in this region that are slowly beginning to improve their economies include Australia and New Zealand. Large deficits run up by both of these governments, however, reduced economic growth for the past three years.
Another strong trading region has been Latin America. Mexico, Brazil and Chile continue to offer outstanding opportunities for Rochester-area exporters but, Shields says, “American exporters have their greatest advantage in Mexico.
“Mexicans prefer to buy U.S.-made goods and over 70 percent of their imports come from the United States.”
Mexico also has made some major changes that have “fine-tuned” its economy and have further opened markets to U.S. manufacturers. As the Mexican economy grows stronger, there will be increased demand for U.S.-made goods.
Mexico also recently repaid its huge financial debts to the United States. This debt was repaid well ahead of schedule.
The fact that America stepped up and offered this financial assistance when it was most needed will benefit U.S. businessmen for many years throughout all of Latin America. (Other Latin American nations were watching to see what the United States would do when Mexico had its economic problems, and they all very much liked what they saw.) The Mexican economy is expected to grow at a rate of at least 4.8 percent in 1997, and this will generate significant trading opportunities for any Rochester-area firms active in this country.
Among the other countries that are “doing it right” in Latin America are Chile and Brazil. Although both of these markets have cooled slightly, both will continue to grow in 1997 and offer numerous business opportunities to regional exporters.
Among the countries in this region with overvalued currencies are Argentina and Brazil. This situation could cause some problems late in the year and overvalued currencies could create some foreign-exchange dilemmas for U.S. and other foreign firms operating in these areas.
Other Latin American countries that are doing better include Colombia, Panama and Venezuela. All have political problems, but rebounding economies will offer opportunities for the cautious businessman.
Regarding the European Union, the United Kingdom, Ireland and the Scandinavian countries look to be the best performers. The United Kingdom had an economic growth rate of 2.5 percent, while Ireland’s growth went up to 5 percent. Both countries saw drops in their unemployment rates, but high unemployment continues to be a major stumbling block for many other Western European countries.
Germany, France and Italy have had almost flat economic growth for the past few years–1.5 percent to 2 percent growth has been the norm in these countries, and with large budget deficits, things are not likely to improve in the coming year.
As mentioned before, the Scandinavian countries, and particularly Finland, are performing somewhat better than other countries in the region, but the only regional signs of sustained economic growth are coming from Eastern Europe.
Poland seems to be the most attractive market in 1997, with Hungary and the Czech Republic also doing well. Russia continues to be a real problem for many U.S. companies. Inflation is too high, regulations vary widely from region to region and some companies have had difficulty getting their profits out of the country.
Compounding this situation in Russia and other parts of Eastern Europe are aggressive organized-crime factions that can make doing business not only more costly than expected, but somewhat dangerous.
To summarize, Western Europe will continue to experience rather flat economic growth in the year ahead, while Eastern Europe may offer some opportunities for prudent exporters.
Other markets that will offer solid, if not spectacular, business opportunities include the Middle East, particularly Saudi Arabia. Major natural-gas development is now under way, and the Saudis prefer to buy American technology.
Other strong economies in this part of the world include Kuwait, Bahrain, Qatar, Egypt and the United Arab Emirates. Also strong in this region is Israel, a country that has historically done very well because of its close ties to the United States.
Canada, the largest market for U.S. goods, continues to build its economy, but at a very slow rate. Although Canada’s national debt ratio is still too high compared to its gross domestic product, its economy has had another year of “consolidation” and its fiscal planning continues to improve.
The Canadian economy will improve slightly in the coming year, but, of this country’s NAFTA partners, the more attractive growth opportunities will occur in Mexico.
In conclusion, 1997 should be another year of strong, if unspectacular, growth for Rochester-area exporters.
If the U.S. economy can continue to grow at a rate of 2.3 percent to 2.4 percent, and if the nation’s inflation rate can remain under 3 percent, the Rochester economy should again thrive this year.
There are several key factors, however, that could create significant economic problems and these bear close watching. If any get “out of control,” they could generate significant negative pressures on what must be considered a fragile U.S. economy.
These factors are:
The U.S. stock market, which is, in the minds of many, somewhat overvalued. With large swings in the values of U.S. stocks being recorded almost daily, this very volatile market could experience an extended loss in value and consumer confidence could fall accordingly.
U.S. consumer debt–it is too high. If it continues to grow and/or if interest rates rise appreciably, consumer confidence could be adversely impacted.
And finally, oil prices could pose a significant problem for the U.S. economy. Fuel costs are too high. If they continue to climb, the Consumer Price Index could be dragged higher and, again, U.S. consumer confidence could be eroded.
If consumer confidence falls, people will slow down in their spending and the negative “ripple” will be felt throughout the economy this year.
Assuming that the above three factors can be kept under control and the U.S. inflation rate is also maintained at its present level, international business executives will have only one other factor to deal with: the increased value of the U.S. dollar.
With the U.S. dollar rising against foreign currencies, selling U.S.-made products overseas will become a little more challenging for all U.S. exporters.
Rochester’s international business community must be aware of this and use the strong dollar to its advantage wherever possible.
A way of using the strong dollar would be to focus on sourcing components from overseas suppliers, and by possibly using Rochester’s foreign trade zone to reduce or eliminate import duties on these components.
Increased personal contact with foreign customers (as a result of reduced foreign travel costs) could be another benefit generated by a stronger U.S. dollar.

International Business Resource Directory

ACCOUNTING

Arthur Andersen LLP
1 Marine Midland Plaza
Suite 1500
Rochester, N.Y. 14604
546-2930
Fax: 546-4636
Contact: Stanley Konopko

Chapman, Collins, Agostinelli & Shaw P.C.
1100 Midtown Tower
Rochester, N.Y. 14604
232-2060
Fax: 454-7389
Contacts: Donald Chapman, James Shaw

Heveron & Heveron Certified Public Accountants P.C.
260 S. Plymouth Ave.
Rochester, N.Y. 14608
232-2956
Fax: 423-0599
E-mail address: heveron@netacc.net
Contacts: John Heveron Jr., Michael Desmond

Mengel, Metzger, Barr & Co. LLP
33 Chestnut St.
Rochester, N.Y. 14604
423-1860
Fax: 423-5966
Contact: Thomas Chiavetta

COMPUTER\ SOFTWARE SERVICES

Advanced Language Translation
145 Armstrong Ave.
Rochester, N.Y. 14617
342-1250
Fax: 342-1270
E-mail address: altserv@aol.com
Contact: Scott Bass

Chapman, Collins, Agostinelli & Shaw P.C.
1100 Midtown Tower
Rochester, N.Y. 14604
232-2060
Fax: 454-7389
Contacts: Donald Chapman, James Shaw

GE Information Services Inc.
1251 Avenue of the Americas
New York, N.Y. 10020
212-575-6056
Contact: Susan Chapin

HCIA/HealthChex Inc.
10 E. Liftbridge Lane
Fairport, N.Y. 14450
377-6270
Fax: 377-7877
E-mail address: dgers@hcia.com
Contact: Marketing and sales department

Penta Technologies
2 Sibleyville Lane
Honeoye Falls, N.Y. 14472
624-7202
Fax: 624-5468
Contact: Madhu Nair

ProServe Corp.
150 Allens Creek Office Park
Rochester, N.Y. 14618
442-7770
Fax: 442-7788
Contact: Howard Budd

Rochester Institute of Technology Research Corp.
125 Tech Park Drive
Rochester, N.Y. 14623
Gary Conners, 239-6009; Bill Erickson, 239-6043; Ron Martino, 239-6082
Fax: 239-6019
E-mail address: ghcrc@rc.rit.edu; bxerc@rc.rit.edu; rjmrc@rc.rit.edu
Contacts: Gary Conners, president; Bill Erickson, director of imaging; Ron Martino, director of image understanding, and acting director, systems/software division

Soliton Associates Inc.
1100 University Ave., Suite 111
Rochester, N.Y. 14607
256-6466
Fax: 256-6469
E-mail address: nancy@soliton.com
Contact: Nancy Lamb

International Business Resource Directory

CULTURE/LANGUAGE INSTRUCTION

Berlitz Language Center
36 W. Main St.
Rochester, N.Y. 14614
232-6424
Fax: 232-6331
Contact: Stefan Tinculescu

ChinaLine
45 Exchange Blvd., Suite 818
Rochester, N.Y. 14614
262-2160
Fax: 262-2167
E-mail address: ChinaLine@compuserve.com
Contact: Shi Han

Image, Culture & Quality Consultants (ICQC)
P.O. Box 429
Penfield, N.Y. 14526
377-4574
Fax: 377-4574
Contact: Jeanete Figueira

Language Intelligence Ltd.
16 N. Goodman St.
Rochester, N.Y. 14607
244-5578
Fax: 244-7880
E-mail address: Dietmar@languageintelligence.com
Irene@languageintelligence.com
Contacts: Irene White, Dietmar Boie

Nazareth College of Rochester
4245 East Ave.
Rochester, N.Y. 14618
389-2525
Fax: 586-2452
E-mail address: emmalina@naz.edu
Contact: Edward Malinak

SUNY College at Brockport
International Institute
350 New Campus Drive
Brockport, N.Y. 14420
395-5467
Fax: 395-2542
Contact: Walter Boston Jr.

Spanish-French Translation Services
174 Woodleaf
Pittsford, N.Y. 14534
381-4517
Contact: Florence Prawer

USA East Associates Inc.
18 Hollingham Rise
Fairport, N.Y. 14450
223-3352
Fax: 223-3352
E-mail address: BADENHOP.SL@juno.com
Contact: Sharon Badenhop

WorkSmart International Inc.
595 Blossom Road
Suite 110
Rochester, N.Y. 14610
654-7420
Fax: 654-9973
Contact: Mary Lallucci

CUSTOMS BROKERAGE

Associated Customhouse Brokers Inc.
P.O. Box 22670
1099 Jay St., Building C5
Rochester, N.Y. 14692
436-3490
Fax: 436-4205
Contact: James Wigton

International Business Resource Directory

EXPORT
MANAGEMENT

Associated Customhouse Brokers Inc.
P.O. Box 22670
1099 Jay St., Building C5
Rochester, N.Y. 14692
436-3490
Fax: 436-4205
Contact: James Wigton

Chase Manhattan Bank N.A.
1 Chase Square
Rochester, N.Y. 14643
258-0827
Fax: 258-0840
Contacts: Dan Duffy, Charles Dugan

ChinaLine
45 Exchange Blvd., Suite 818
Rochester, N.Y. 14614
262-2160
Fax: 262-2167
E-mail address: ChinaLine@compuserve.com
Contact: Shi Han

EXPORT TRADING

Marine Midland Bank
1 Marine Midland Plaza
Rochester, N.Y. 14639
238-7218
Fax: 238-7140
Contact: Herbert Major

SafeSupplies Inc.
4 Elmwood Hill Lane
Rochester, N.Y. 14610
385-9007
Fax: 385-8739
E-mail: hjrundle@safesupplies.com
Contact: Hugh Rundle

International Business Resource Directory

FOREIGN GOVERNMENT CONTACTS

Algeria
Commercial Section
2118 Kalorama Road NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-265-2800
Fax: 202-667-2174

Argentina
Commercial Section
1600 New Hampshire Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20009
202-939-6400
Fax: 202-775-4388

Armenia
Commercial Section
2225 R St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-319-1976
Fax: 202-319-2982

Australia
AusTrade
1601 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20036
202-797-3000, ext. 3244
Fax: 202-797-3155

Austria
Trade Commission
1350 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 501
Washington, D.C. 20036
202-835-8962
Fax: 202-835-8960

Azerbaijan
Embassy
P.O. Box 27839
Washington, D.C. 20038
202-842-0001
Fax: 202-842-0004

Bahamas
Commercial Section
2220 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-319-2660
Fax: 202-319-2668

Barbados
Commercial Section
2144 Wyoming Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-939-9200
Fax: 202-332-7467

Belarus
Commercial Section
1619 New Hampshire Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20009
202-986-1604
Fax: 202-986-1805

Belgium
Commercial Section
3330 Garfield St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-625-5853
Fax: 202-625-6252

Bolivia
Commercial Section
3014 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-483-4410
Fax: 202-328-3712

Brazil
Commercial Section
3006 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-238-2765
Fax: 202-238-2827

Bulgaria
Commercial Section
1621 22nd St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-387-7969
Fax: 202-234-7973

Canada
Commercial Section
501 Pennsylvania Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20001
202-682-1740
Fax: 202-682-7795
or Canadian Consulate-General
3000 Marine Midland Center, 30th Floor
Buffalo, N.Y. 14203
858-9500
Fax: 852-4340

Chad
Commercial Section
2002 R St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20009
202-462-4009
Fax: 202-265-1937

Chile
Commercial Section
1732 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20036
202-429-8835
Fax: 202-659-3220

China, PeopleÕs Republic of
Commercial Section
2133 Wisconsin Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20007
202-625-3380
Fax: 202-337-5864

Colombia
Commercial Section
1701 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Suite 560
Washington, D.C. 20006
202-463-6679
Fax: 202-223-0526

Costa Rica
Commercial Section
2114 S St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20009
202-234-2945
Fax: 202-265-4795

Cyprus
Embassy
2211 R St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-462-5772
Fax: 202-483-6710

Czech Republic
Commercial Section
3900 Spring of Freedom St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-274-9110
Fax: 202-244-2147

Denmark
Commercial Section
3200 Whitehaven St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-234-4300
Fax: 202-328-1470

Dominican Republic
Commercial Section
1715 22nd St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-332-6280
Fax: 202-265-8057

Ecuador
Commercial Section
2535 15th St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20009
202-667-2194
Fax: 202-265-9325

Egypt
Commercial Section
2232 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-265-9111
Fax: 202-328-4517

El Salvador
Commercial Section
2308 California St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-265-9671
Fax: 202-328-0563

Estonia
Chancery
630 Fifth Ave., Suite 2415
New York, N.Y. 10111
212-247-7634
Fax: 212-262-0893

Ethiopia
Commercial Section
1800 K St., Suite 624
Washington, D.C. 20006
202-452-1272
Fax: 202-223-0137

France
Commercial Section
4101 Reservoir Road NW
Washington, D.C. 20007
202-944-6000
Fax: 202-944-6336

Germany
Commercial Section
4645 Reservoir Road NW
Washington, D.C. 20007
202-298-4000
Fax: 202-298-4249

Greece
Commercial Section
2211 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-332-2844
Fax: 202-328-3105

Guatemala
Commercial Section
2220 R St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-745-4952, ext. 114
Fax: 202-745-1908

Honduras
Commercial Section
3007 Tilden St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-966-7702
Fax: 202-966-9751

Hong Kong
Economic and Trade Office/British
Consulate-General
680 Fifth Ave., 22nd Floor
New York, N.Y. 10019
212-265-8888
Fax: 212-974-3209

Hungary
Office of Commercial Counselor
150 E. 58th St., 33rd Floor
New York, N.Y. 10155
212-752-3060
Fax: 212-486-2958

Iceland
Commercial Section
800 Third Ave., 36th Floor
New York, N.Y. 10022
212-593-2700
Fax: 212-593-6269

India
Commercial Section
2536 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-939-9834
Fax: 202-797-4693

Indonesia
Commercial Section
2020 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20036
202-775-5200
Fax: 202-775-5365

Ireland
Commercial Section
2234 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-462-3939
Fax: 202-232-5993

Israel
Economic Office
3514 International Drive NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-364-5691
Fax: 202-364-5647

Italy
Commercial Section
1601 Fuller St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20009
202-328-5500
Fax: 202-328-5538

Jamaica
Commercial Section
1520 New Hampshire Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20036
202-452-0660
Fax: 202-452-0081

Japan
Commercial Section
2520 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-939-6700
Fax: 202-265-9473

Jordan
Embassy
3504 International Drive NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-966-2664
Fax: 202-966-3110

Kenya
Commercial Section
2249 R St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-387-6101
Fax: 202-462-3829

Kuwait
Embassy
2940 Tilden St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-966-0702
Fax: 202-966-0517

Kyrgyzstan
Embassy
1732 Wisconsin Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20007
202-338-5141
Fax: 202-338-5139

Latvia
Commercial Section
4325 17th St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20011
202-726-8213/202-726-8214
Fax: 202-726-6785

Lebanon
Commercial Section
2560 28th St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-939-6300
Fax: 202-939-6324

Lithuania
Commercial and Economic Section
2622 16th St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20009
202-234-5860
Fax: 202-328-0466

Malaysia
Commercial Section
2407 California St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-328-2785
Fax: 202-332-8914

Mexico
Trade Commission
375 Park Ave., 19th Floor
New York, N.Y. 10152
212-826-2916
Fax: 212-826-2979

Moldova
Mission to the United Nations
573-577 Third Ave.
New York, N.Y. 10016
212-682-3523
Fax: 212-682-6274

The Netherlands
Chamber of Commerce
1 Rockefeller Plaza, Suite 1420
New York, N.Y. 10020
212-265-6460
Fax: 212-265-6402

New Zealand
Trade Development Board
37 Observatory Circle NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-328-4800
Fax: 202-265-9659

Nigeria
Commercial Section
2201 Elm St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20036
202-822-1505
Fax: 202-775-1385

Norway
Commercial Section
2720 34th St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-333-6000
Fax: 202-337-3567

Pakistan
Economic Office
2315 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-939-6223
Fax: 202-483-5275

Panama
Embassy
2862 McGill Terrace NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-483-1407
Fax: 202-483-8413

Peru
Commercial Section
1700 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20036
202-833-9860
Fax: 202-659-8124

The Philippines
Commercial Section
1600 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20036
202-467-9300
Fax: 202-328-7614

Poland
Commercial Office
100 Park Ave., 19th Floor
New York, N.Y. 10017
212-370-5300
Fax: 212-818-9623

Portugal
Commercial Section
2125 Kalorama Road NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-328-8610
Fax: 202-462-3726

Romania
Commercial Section
1607 23rd St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-332-4852, ext. 141
Fax: 202-232-6593

Russia
Commercial Section
2001 Connecticut Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-232-5988
Fax: 202-232-2917

Saudi Arabia
Commercial Section
601 New Hampshire Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20037
202-342-3800
Fax: 202-342-0271

Singapore
Commercial Section
3501 International Place NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-537-3100
Fax: 202-537-0876

South Africa
Commercial Section
3201 New Mexico Ave. NW, Suite 300
Washington, D.C. 20016
202-966-1650
Fax: 202-966-5919

South Korea
Commercial Section
2450 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-939-5600
Fax: 202-939-5669

Spain
Commercial Section
2558 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-265-8600
Fax: 202-265-9478

Sweden
Commercial Section
1501 M St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20005
202-467-2600
Fax: 202-467-2699

Switzerland
Commercial Section
2900 Cathedral Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-745-7930
Fax: 202-387-2564

Taiwan
Economic Division/TECRO
4301 Connecticut Ave. NW, Suite 420
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-686-6400
Fax: 202-363-6294

Thailand
Office of Commercial Counselor
1024 Wisconsin Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20007
202-467-6790
Fax: 202-429-2949

Trinidad and Tobago
Commercial Section
1708 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20036
202-467-6490
Fax: 202-785-3130

Turkey
Commercial Section
3005 Massachusetts Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-483-6366
Fax: 202-483-6040

Ukraine
Embassy
3350 M St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20007
202-333-0606
Fax: 202-333-0817

United Kingdom
British Trade Office
845 Third Ave.
New York, N.Y. 10022
212-745-0495
Fax: 212-745-0456

Venezuela
Commercial Section
1099 30th St. NW
Washington, D.C. 20007
202-342-2214
Fax: 202-342-6820

International Business Resource Directory

FREIGHT SERVICES

Air

Associated Customhouse Brokers Inc.
P.O. Box 22670
1099 Jay St., Building C5
Rochester, N.Y. 14692
436-3490
Fax: 436-4205
Contact: James Wigton

East End Moving & Storage Inc.
P.O. Box 60589
1133 Emerson St.
Rochester, N.Y. 14606
647-9030/800-333-0763
Fax: 647-3004
Contacts: Marabeth Galardi, Robert Humphreys, Robert Galardi

Global Van & Storage Inc.
400 Mason Road
Fairport, N.Y. 14450
223-2190
Fax: 223-9671
Contact: Stephen Roe

One Stop Packaging and Shipping Center
2012 E. Ridge Road
Rochester, N.Y. 14622
467-9590/467-9599
Fax: 266-8600
E-mail address: stedew@servtech.com
Contact: Stephen Dewey

Panalpina Inc.
970 Driving Park Ave.
Rochester, N.Y. 14613
458-3570
Fax: 458-3575
Contact: Kristine Later Coulombier

Rochester Distribution Unlimited Inc. (R.D.U. Inc.)
970 Driving Park Ave.
Rochester, N.Y. 14613
458-0750
Fax: 458-8112
Contacts: William Finnerty, Robert Viscardi, Robert Koutras

U.S. Postal Service
P.O. Box 22908
1335 Jefferson Road
Rochester, N.Y. 14692
272-7220
Fax: 272-5979
Contact: Donna Economides

Ground (limited to firms whose own
vehicles provide international
transport)

Associated Customhouse Brokers Inc.
P.O. Box 22670
1099 Jay St., Building C5
Rochester, N.Y. 14692
436-3490
Fax: 436-4205
Contact: James Wigton

C&M Forwarding Co. Inc.
322 Oak St.
Rochester, N.Y. 14608
232-7848
Fax: 232-6581
Contact: Kevin Daley
East End Moving & Storage Inc.
P.O. Box 60589
1133 Emerson St.
Rochester, N.Y. 14606
647-9030/800-333-0763
Fax: 647-3004
Contacts: Marabeth Galardi, Robert Humphreys, Robert Galardi

Global Van & Storage Inc.
400 Mason Road
Fairport, N.Y. 14450
223-2190
Fax: 223-9671
Contact: Stephen Roe

One Stop Packaging and Shipping Center
2012 E. Ridge Road
Rochester, N.Y. 14622
467-9590/467-9599
Fax: 266-8600
E-mail address: stedew@servtech.com
Contact: Stephen Dewey

Rochester Distribution Unlimited Inc. (R.D.U. Inc.)
970 Driving Park Ave.
Rochester, N.Y. 14613
458-0750
Fax: 458-8112
Contacts: William Finnerty, Robert Viscardi, Robert Koutras

U.S. Postal Service
P.O. Box 22908
1335 Jefferson Road
Rochester, N.Y. 14692
272-7220
Fax: 272-5979
Contact: Donna Economides

Ocean

Associated Customhouse Brokers Inc.
P.O. Box 22670
1099 Jay St., Building C5
Rochester, N.Y. 14692
436-3490
Fax: 436-4205
Contact: James Wigton

East End Moving & Storage Inc.
P.O. Box 60589
1133 Emerson St.
Rochester, N.Y. 14606
647-9030/800-333-0763
Fax: 647-3004
Contacts: Marabeth Galardi, Robert Humphreys, Robert Galardi

Global Van & Storage Inc.
400 Mason Road
Fairport, N.Y. 14450
223-2190
Fax: 223-9671
Contact: Stephen Roe

One Stop Packaging and Shipping Center
2012 E. Ridge Road
Rochester, N.Y. 14622
467-9590/467-9599
Fax: 266-8600
E-mail address: stedew@servtech.com
Contact: Stephen Dewey

Panalpina Inc.
970 Driving Park Ave.
Rochester, N.Y. 14613
458-3570
Fax: 458-3575
Contact: Kristine Later Coulombier

Rochester Distribution Unlimited Inc. (R.D.U. Inc.)
970 Driving Park Ave.
Rochester, N.Y. 14613
458-0750
Fax: 458-8112
Contacts: William Finnerty, Robert Viscardi, Robert Koutras

U.S. Postal Service
P.O. Box 22908
1335 Jefferson Road
Rochester, N.Y. 14692
272-7220
Fax: 272-5979
Contact: Donna Economides

International Business Resource Directory

GOVERNMENT AGENCIES, FEDERAL

Agency for International Development
Center for Trade & Investment
Services
800-872-4348

Agriculture, Department of
Foreign Agricultural Services
AgPort Connections
202-720-7103

Office of the Western Hemisphere
202-395-3412

Overseas Private Investment Corp.
202-336-8663
Contact: Lowana Gray

U.S. Customs Service
1200 Brooks Ave.
Room M-131
Rochester, N.Y. 14624
263-6293
Fax: 263-5828
Contact: Port Director

U.S. Department of Commerce U.S. & Foreign Commercial Service
111 East Ave.
Suite 220
Rochester, N.Y. 14604
263-6480
Fax: 325-6505
Contact: James Mariano
Trade Information Center
800-872-8723

U.S. Postal Service
P.O. Box 22908
1335 Jefferson Road
Rochester, N.Y. 14692
272-7220
Fax: 272-5979
Contact: Donna Economides

U.S. Small Business Administration
100 State St.
Room 410
Rochester, N.Y. 14614
263-6700
Fax: 263-3146
Contact: Peter Flihan

GOVERNMENT AGENCIES, LOCAL AND STATE

Local:

City of Rochester Economic
Development Department/Rochester Economic Development Corp.
30 Church St.
Room 005A
Rochester, N.Y. 14614
428-6808
Fax: 428-6042
Contact: Fashun Ku

Genesee County Industrial
Development Agency
1 Mill St.
Batavia, N.Y. 14020
343-4866
Fax: 343-0848
Contact: Alice Cocalas

Genesee/Finger Lakes Regional
Planning Council
1427 Monroe Ave.
Rochester, N.Y. 14618
442-3770
Fax: 442-3786
Contact: Paul Howard

Livingston County Economic
Development
6 Court St., Room 306
Geneseo, N.Y. 14454
243-7124
Fax: 243-7126
E-mail address: livecodv@frontiernet.net
Contact: Patrick Rountree

Monroe County Department of
Communications and Special Events
39 W. Main St., Room 204
Rochester, N.Y. 14614
428-2380
Fax: 428-3268
Contact: John Riley

Monroe County Department of
Planning and Development
2 State St.
Suite 500
Rochester, N.Y. 14614
428-5347
Fax: 428-2147
E-mail address: melissa@vivanet.com
Contact: Paul Hohensee

Monroe County Industrial
Development Agency
2 State St.
Suite 500
Rochester, N.Y. 14614
428-2186
Fax: 428-2147
Contact: Rocco DiGiovanni

Ontario County Office
of Economic Development
2525 Rochester Road
Canandaigua, N.Y. 14424
396-4460
Fax: 396-4594
Contact: Michael Manikowski

Orleans County Industrial
Development Agency
14016 W. Route 31
Albion, N.Y. 14411
589-7060
Fax: 589-8105
Contact: Victoria Pratt

Rochester/Finger Lakes Regional Development Corp.
111 East Ave., Suite 221
Rochester, N.Y. 14604
454-2530
Fax: 454-6634
Contact: Fred Jennings

Wayne Economic Development Corp.
16 William St.
Lyons, N.Y. 14489
315-946-5917
Fax: 315-946-5918
Contact: Barbara Harper

State:

Empire State Development
111 East Ave., Suite 220
Rochester, N.Y. 14604
325-1944
Fax: 325-6505
Contacts: David Hoffman, Mark Scheuerman

New York State Science
and Technology Foundation
99 Washington Ave.
Suite 1731
Albany, N.Y. 12210
518-474-4349
Fax: 518-473-6876
Contact: Joseph Magno

International Business Resource Directory

MARKET RESEARCH

AIMM Inc.
1857 Blossom Road
Rochester, N.Y. 14625
586-9100
Fax: 586-2360
E-mail address: AIMM4xlns@aol.com
Contact: James Dawson

ChinaLine
45 Exchange Blvd., Suite 818
Rochester, N.Y. 14614
262-2160
Fax: 262-2167
E-mail address: ChinaLine@compuserve.com
Contact: Shi Han

Dun & Bradstreet Information Services, a division of the Dun & Bradstreet Corp.
703 Harvest Drive
Rochester, N.Y. 14626
225-0075
Fax: 225-5560
Web site: http://www.dbisna.com/
Contact: Mark Heinkel

KnowledgeWorks!
12 Creekdale Lane
Rochester, N.Y. 14618
248-2229
Fax: 383-6055
E-mail address: lindaws@frontiernet.net
102006.3401@compuserve.com
Contact: Linda Stevenson

R.A. Schoeneberger & Associates Ltd.
1 Concord Drive
Pittsford, N.Y. 14534
248-3025
Fax: 248-2265
Contact: Ronald Schoeneberger

Rochester Research Group
P.O. Box 22954
Rochester, N.Y. 14692
924-3620
Fax: 924-3715
E-mail address: rrg22954@frontiernet.net
Contact: Jocelyn Goldberg Schaible

SUNY College at Brockport International Institute
350 New Campus Drive
Brockport, N.Y. 14420
395-5467
Fax: 395-2542
Contact: Walter Boston Jr.

USA East Associates Inc.
18 Hollingham Rise
Fairport, N.Y. 14450
223-3352
Fax: 223-3352
E-mail address: BADENHOP.SL@juno.com
Contact: Sharon Badenhop

PROMOTION

AIMM Inc.
1857 Blossom Road
Rochester, N.Y. 14625
586-9100
Fax: 586-2360
E-mail address: AIMM4xlns@aol.com
Contact: James Dawson

entICE
2290 East Ave.
Rochester, N.Y. 14610
256-3500
Fax: 244-0628
Contact: Gene Cairo

Rochester/Finger Lakes Regional Development Corp.
111 East Ave.
Suite 221
Rochester, N.Y. 14604
454-2530
Fax: 454-6634
Contact: Fred Jennings

International Business Resource Directory

OTHER SOURCES

Buck & Pulleyn Inc./Worldcom Group Inc.
(advertising, public relations and sales promotion)
500 Helendale Road
Rochester, N.Y. 14609
288-6900
Fax: 288-4474
E-mail address: cpulleyn@pulleyn.com
Contact: Chris Pulleyn

CB Commercial/Upstate Partners of Rochester
(commercial real estate)
125 Indigo Creek Drive
Rochester, N.Y. 14626
227-5400
Fax: 227-4479
E-mail address: 72062,742@compuserve.com
Contact: Dave Wallace

Career Development Services Inc.
(partner-relocation assistance
program)
706 East Ave.
Rochester, N.Y. 14607
244-0750
Fax: 244-7115
Web site: http://www.ggw.org/freenet/c/cds/
Contact: Deborah Nicholas

Corporate Events
(international corporate VIP host program)
944 Allens Creek Road
Rochester, N.Y. 14618
385-8660
Fax: 385-8660
Contact: Stacy Makhlouf

Genesee/Finger Lakes Regional Planning Council
(mapping, research and economic demographics; aviation/airport development)
1427 Monroe Ave.
Rochester, N.Y. 14618
442-3770
Fax: 442-3786
Contact: Paul Howard

Hartmann International Services Inc.
(foreign-language video and film production)
1100 Sibley Tower
Rochester, N.Y. 14604
325-3460
Fax: 325-5422
E-mail address: his@eznet.net
Contact: Walter Hartmann

ICE Inc.
(marketing communications)
2290 East Ave.
Rochester, N.Y. 14610
244-5400
Fax: 244-5468
Contact: Mike Fountain

International Mergers and Acquisitions Inc.
(location of international partners and joint ventures)
40 Coral Way
Rochester, N.Y. 14618
461-1272
Fax: 461-1272
Contact: Stanley Spector

Lloyd Prescott Cos.
(worldwide corporate recruiting)
656 Kreag Road
Pittsford, N.Y. 14534
586-9440
Fax: 385-6293
Contact: Frank DiCesare

M&T Bank
(foreign exchange)
44 Exchange St.
Rochester, N.Y. 14614
842-4615
Fax: 842-2336
Contact: Michael Quinlivan

Martino, Angora & Flynn LLC
(advertising)
500 CrossKeys Office Park
Fairport, N.Y. 14450
387-0740
Contact: Ray Martino

McBride Associates
(archaeologists/anthropologists)
12 Spring St.
Mount Morris, N.Y. 14510
658-3029
Fax: 658-3029
Contacts: Charles Cottone, John Genereux

Monroe FTZ Operators Inc.
(foreign trade zone)
39 Breck St.
Rochester, N.Y. 14609
482-9510
Fax: 482-7095
Contact: Michael Smith

Nik Entertainment Co.
(corporate entertainment)
274 N. Goodman St.
Rochester, N.Y. 14607
244-0331
Fax: 244-0356
E-mail address: nikniceguy@aol.com
Contact: Carolyn Schultz

Resources and Management International Inc.
(foreign joint-venture opportunity searching)
136 Oakshire Way
Pittsford, N.Y. 14534
383-1013
Fax: 248-0026
E-mail address: dashcorp@ix.netcom.com
Contact: B.C. Dash

SBM International
(Middle East consulting)
944 Allens Creek Road
Rochester, N.Y. 14618
385-8660
Fax: 385-8660
Contact: Edward Makhlouf

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