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High-tech execs split on race

When Xerox Corp. CEO Paul Allaire backed Bill Clinton for president yesterday, he and other high-tech business leaders said Clinton’s policies had helped their companies thrive.
Yet high-tech executives in Rochester fall on both sides of the political fence.
“I’ll be voting for Bob Dole,” said Mark Hiltz, president and owner of Service Tech Inc., a local Internet access provider.
“Bill Clinton may be the high-tech president, but I don’t necessarily see him as the small-business president,” added Hiltz, a registered Republican.
Donald Turrell, president of Performance Technologies Inc., voted for George Bush four years ago. He remains undecided about the candidates this time around.
PTI manufactures high-performance equipment used in cellular communications, data storage and networking products. The company made an initial public offering in January.
Turrell would like to see changes in regulatory measures, like those public companies are subject to under the Securities and Exchange Commission–“a terribly inefficient process,” he said. And PTI, which sells to defense contractors, would benefit from a defense budget that allocates funds to electronic equipment, he said.
“At this point, I don’t see enough substance to understand where (the candidates) might stand on some of these issues,” Turrell said.
Clinton’s support of exporting reform sits well with Ken Chellam, co-owner of Tex-Port Inc., a local computer dealer with revenues in the $12 million range.
“I have to agree with Paul Allaire,” Chellam said. “Whatever (Clinton) does that’s good for high-tech business is good for us.”
Turrell agreed that streamlining export controls was a big positive for his company.
Allaire and 74 other executives who announced their support for Clinton on Tuesday were not joined by Eastman Kodak Co. CEO George Fisher. A registered independent, Fisher does not publicly endorse any political candidate, spokesman James Blamphin said.

High-tech execs split on race

When Xerox Corp. CEO Paul Allaire backed Bill Clinton for president yesterday, he and other high-tech business leaders said Clinton’s policies had helped their companies thrive.
Yet high-tech executives in Rochester fall on both sides of the political fence.

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