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Computer & Business Show Guide

Welcome! The Greater Rochester Chamber of Commerce is proud to again sponsor the 11th Annual Rochester Computer & Business Show, and extends greetings to exhibitors and show visitors.
This show provides an excellent opportunity for area businesses to market and promote their products and services. Over 400 exhibits will demonstrate the high level of office and home technology available in the Rochester-area marketplace.
Additionally, a variety of business training and professional development seminars are scheduled during the show. For example, the Rochester Project Committee will make ongoing presentations on the “Interactive Living Room,” demonstrating multimedia technologies that are becoming available in the home for education and study, access to information, home-office use and improved contact with the workplace.
In view of the high level of business participation, this year’s show is an important indication of economic strength and vitality in the Greater Rochester area.
If you are an exhibitor, the Chamber is proud of your work and contribution to the community. If you are a show visitor, we invite you to enjoy the many exciting exhibits developed to meet your needs and interests.
Again, welcome and enjoy the best our community offers in this year’s Rochester Computer & Business Show.
Thomas T. Mooney
President
Greater Rochester Metro Chamber of Commerce Inc.

40 Accounting software’s brave new world
By Eric Cohen
Accounting software remains stuck in a state of transition, one with opportunities for great reward–and great loss.

41 Business embraces videoconferencingby
By Mike Dickinson
Recent innovations and price reductions have brought the technology into the realm of small business. And experts extol the group-productivity benefits.

42 Welcome to the virtual office
By Jacqueline A. Marsh
Telecommuting has removed the traditional boundaries of the workplace. It has advantages and disadvantages, and implementation requires planning and ongoing commitment.

42 Beware of office-supply scams
By Phillip Tiberio
“We are calling because we have a great sale going on right now on toner for your copier. With all the price changes lately and more to come, now would be a great time to purchase a case of toner and really save! Sound good?” If you get a call that sounds like this, watch out.

43 Making the most of minimal space
By Tracey Rosenthal Drury
Self-enclosed office pods are the latest idea in office environments. For Xerox Corp., they offered a way to provide work areas for part-time or temporary employees without creating new office space.

44 Make customer fax machines work for you
By David Shaffer
Using fax-on-demand, your customers can have copies of product literature and other documents faxed to them whenever they want.

45 Seminar schedule

46 List of exhibitors

Cover design by Patricia A. Beckmann and Kimberly McKinzie

Computer & Business Show Guide

And now for something completely different: a quick tour through the attic of time. Take the old blankets off some eight-track tapes, buggy whips, 8-inch floppy disks–products whose time has come and gone. Look! By the trunk we used last when junior went to camp in the fifth grade–a DEC Rainbow, a PC Junior and an Apple Lisa! We have a Betamax like that one at the cottage. There is a thick layer of dust on some of this software. A big investment down the drain! Wait–is that MS-DOS over there? But … I’m still using that! Is my business investment in software–and my accounting systems–going down the drain?
No, it is not time to worry! This column is our annual review of accounting software for growing businesses. Accounting software remains stuck in a state of transition–four year’s worth so far. In response to customer demand, the major accounting software vendors (ASVs) are involved in an all-out effort to produce Microsoft Windows-based accounting software. However, Microsoft Corp.’s plans change rapidly–witness Windows 95. In fact, they change so quickly that once the accounting software vendor has time to actually develop its product, it is obsolete.
This column should be of particular interest to those responsible for acquiring and maintaining financial systems for business and for managers looking to get the information they need to run their business. During times of transition, there are opportunities for great reward and great loss. Trailblazers can set new standards and reap the benefits of a head start; they also can find everyone else went down a different path a long time ago–and it takes a long time to catch up.
What are the costs to your business of having gone down the wrong path? Can you safely take advantage of cutting-edge technology? You may need a tour guide to help you prepare for the possible road blocks, as well as knowing which benefits may await you.
What kind of benefits are we talking about? Software that fits your business like a glove, reduces human error and effort, and gets information to you when you need it. The new breed of software includes Internet capabilities, customization technologies that let you turn the software from an 84 percent match for your business to a 97 percent match for your business, and integration with other office technology.
The ASVs’ goals are to provide software that sells, based on the demand for Windows compatibility, Windows’ reported ease of use, Windows’ multitasking and graphical (customizable) capabilities, links to tools like Microsoft Access or Excel, as well as Windows’ report writers, like Crystal Reports. Windows is where it is happening for other new technologies too–like optical-character-recognition forms processing and scanning, and Lotus Notes.

State of transition
How do you make software flexible and powerful enough to fit your business like a glove? Most companies thought the promise of Microsoft Windows was the way to go.
The ASVs announced their Windows accounting starting in 1991. Just two years ago, there were few high-end Windows accounting packages out in part or whole. Some were from smaller companies; others were first attempts from larger vendors: slow and buggy. Plans to have software that runs on Macintosh, Unix and Windows computers (cross-platform development) have largely been scrapped over four years. The industry changes and plans change, largely thanks to Microsoft.
Microsoft, of course, is pushing a world that is all-Microsoft: no Novell, no Unix. This push deeply affects the ASVs, which mostly are smaller developers, who are not able to invest in every hardware platform and multiple operating system.
Windows offerings from low-end Peachtree and DacEasy are well-done, but do not have the same depth as their DOS counterparts. Peachtree for Windows, for example, is very flexible, customizable and powerful. Forms, reports and data searches all seem easier and more robust. Fonts, graphics and easy access to multiple functions at one time (like looking up a customer’s balance without leaving invoice entry from your vendors) are all easy to do with a graphical user interface. But Peachtree for Windows cannot keep track of open orders, unlike its DOS counterpart. The popularity of the low-end packages under Windows, however, provides the necessary foundation for their growth as viable solutions for business.
High-end Windows-based accounting stands like lemmings at the edge of a cliff. AV/32 from Intellisoft Inc. (800-933-4889) was the first out, a strong offering from a smaller company. Great Plains Software’s Dynamics (800-456-0025) is on its second major release, and has finally released its Sales Order module, and promotes Lotus Notes Integration. Solomon IV from Solomon Software (800-879-0444) provides SQL capabilities on peer-to-peer networks and Windows NT.
In addition, SBT Corp. has many Windows modules available, as well as Internet integration. Macola (800-468-0834) is introducing its customizable Windows upgrade. Platinum (800-999-1809) enters the fray with its General Ledger and Computer Associates International Inc. (800-225-5224) prepares its AR and AP to go with its 1-year-old General Ledger. Others wait in the wings after three years, hoping to quickly catch up with new software-development tools, taking notes of what works, while avoiding the pitfalls of GUI accounting.
How have they done with their Windows efforts? One of the most quoted resources on accounting software is the biannual PC Magazine review. This year’s review will prove to be very interesting. Based only on the basic accounting modules (general ledger, accounts receivable and accounts payable), the year’s announced winners are Great Plains Dynamics and Solomon IV. Honorable mention went to Macola Software, whose strength always has been in its distribution and manufacturing modules, but whose accounting functionality also has been strengthened in its latest version. Few of the major vendors have all of their promised modules available. Some are in transition from a simple port (of their DOS software to Windows) to a fully customizable system. Others are in their second- or third-generation Windows-based product. The rest cannot get off the ground.
Now the ASVs have two years until the next PC Magazine review. Those two years are filled with promise. Macola will have shipped more of its version 7. Computer Associates, CYMA and Platinum, which have only delivered only one or two modules to date, will have filled out their lines. RealWorld Corp. and State of the Art Inc. (M*A*S 90), which have not begun to ship their accounting for Windows, will have made their first steps. The transition from DOS to Windows will continue. But someone keeps raising the bar.
Aug. 24, 1995, was the official launch date of Windows 95. Microsoft has made a huge effort to get people to move to it. Many companies that had to make the decision to move from DOS to a GUI have chosen to go directly to Windows 95.
Is that a reason to get Windows 95- compliant accounting software? If you run one software package under Windows 95 that is not Windows 95-specific, it can slow down all the rest of your computing. That means a non-Windows 95 package reduces the benefits of Windows 95.

Why the transition is a problem
The transition leaves many users hanging. Which way is the best way to go now? The development problems and new capabilities cause a lot of problems for users and consultants. The transition time is one of promises, but no delivery; of demand, but nothing to fill it.
Many companies are looking forward to the capabilities and feature sets of the next-generation accounting packages– but are looking at years going by before all of their current software is updated. It is hard to know how bad your system is compared with the next release, but not be able to do anything about it.
In addition to duplicating present systems, users want new capabilities. Users need to send business documents using electronic data interchange and want to know about business on the Internet. However, it is the ASVs that set the direction of the near future. New products and technologies need to be embraced by the ASVs to make them available to software users. But technology changes so quickly that today’s leader is tomorrow’s follower. Many companies are not ready to embrace the cutting edge.
Many businesses and accounting departments are happily on DOS, Unix or the Macintosh, thank you, and have not committed themselves to the move to any version of Microsoft Windows (3.1, Workgroups, 95 or NT). CPAs, in particular, are finding themselves being forced into the Windows world by their clients. Others are finding that their favorite software package will come out only with a Windows version in the future. This is what is forcing their hand to look for Windows accounting. According to a representative from Timeslips (800-285- 0999), which produces the best known time and billing package, an overwhelming move to Windows has taken place, even though the firm offers both DOS and Windows upgrades.
Many people are weighing the claims of Windows and Windows 95, and considering moving everything they can into the Windows environment, including their accounting software. Finding decent accounting software for larger companies on any graphical platform, including the Macintosh, is not easy.
The state of transition prompts users to postpone decisions or make hasty ones. What would drive them to a hasty decision?

The drivers of Windows accounting
A decree comes down from on high: “Update the accounting software and make sure it runs on Windows!” (That sounds simple enough.) “We are looking for an accounting system that runs under Windows 95, uses SQL (structured query language) as the back end, meets our business needs exactly, and has five years’ market experience.” (Ma’am, Windows 95 was just released last month! Sigh.) What drives big and smaller companies to consider–no, demand–Windows accounting?
One of the drivers of the more sophisticated packages is downsizing by large corporations. The ASVs of high-end packages are courting large companies, which are seeking to replace mainframes and minis before their COBOL programs have to deal with the year 2000. The ASVs are adding multicurrency and multilanguage support, as well as increasing field sizes and adding other big-company features. Large companies want data bases and programming languages that fit into corporate standards, the only way to be efficient when supporting thousands of computers. Larger companies also are some of the least prepared for the software.
Large companies are looking for a friendlier user interface and superior reporting capabilities. Others look for customization without traditional programming. But, the PC world is temporarily topsy-turvy. Large corporations often have the least powerful PCs available to their users, while, at home, the latest Pentium powerhouses are running the games and multimedia CDs.
Lower-end packages also are growing in sophistication, and meeting more of the needs of small and growing businesses. Small business needs big-company features, but does not have the support channel (like a data-processing department) of the typical big company. Small companies buying computers for the first time want software that works with their machines, which probably came with Windows and Office Suite- type products loaded.

Business on the Internet: the cutting edge
Companies just setting up shop have the advantage of buying better computers that do more at a lower price than their established competition. One of the most popular areas to set up shop is very new: the World Wide Web. Rent is relatively cheap. Start-up costs are low. The ASVs differ in their opinion of how soon you should get started.
Although the Internet has been around for 25 years, the World Wide Web has had explosive growth only in the last year. The major online services, like CompuServe and America Online, are only now offering Web pages to their subscribers. The laws about commerce on the Web are up to question. Some companies are making a lot of money there, selling product, and selling “How to Sell on the Internet” advice. The Web is an excellent delivery vehicle for information, communication and software demonstrations, fixes and enhancements. There also is room for great disaster.
SBT Corp. (http://www.sbtcorp.com) is ready to put your company up on the Web to sell products. Computer Associates (http://www.cai.com) is concerned that security will not be in place for at least two years to do any more than simple marketing on the Net. Solomon Software (http://www.solomon.com) and Great Plains (http://www.gps.com) are on the Net, but moving cautiously before providing products to their users.

Need for a tour guide
Is it time to be cautious?
The new software comes with flexibility and sophistication as never before. A good partnership with a knowledgeable consultant/VAR is necessary to take advantage of the customize-for-one features of the software.
Replacing a current working system– overwriting a good working system– means that if things don’t work, due to hardware incompatibilities, buggy software and unmet promises, you need to get back to where you were, an imposing task when mixing operating system, network and program changes.
Success is fickle. You don’t necessarily become a success (or work safely) by going with a winner (such as the formerly popular LAN Manager and 3Com networks). The technologically superior do not win (Javelin) where marketing suffers.
Maximizing your investment in new systems means to not only do the required accounting functions, but make your business more competitive: faster to respond, better information at hand more quickly, fewer losses caused by decisions based on incomplete information. It also means being able to take advantage of the latest tools, without being taken advantage of.
Many companies are looking for GUI packages. They want links to other GUI tools like Microsoft Access or Excel, to do graphing and charting, and get better reports more quickly and accurately. Hasty decisions have seen people go through avoidable problems: hardware limitations, unacceptable slowdowns, remote application slowdown, printers and networks unsuitable to the task, computers not up to the task (limited disk space, RAM, CPU speed, monitors), employees with a mouse adversity, learning problems and expectations due to functionality and usage differences between DOS and Windows, and numerous other problems.

The bottom line
Do you feel forced to make a decision now? Get as much information as you can–be prepared. Can you hold off making a decision? The dust may shake out, but it will probably take around two years.
Looking to implement the latest in accounting software technology? There is a treacherous road ahead of you, filled with danger at every step. With the right tour guide to lead you forward (or help you backtrack if necessary) you can begin to take advantage of the latest technology today, armed with the knowledge of the possible roadblocks, as well as knowing which benefits may await you.
(Eric Cohen CPA is owner of Cohen Computer Consulting, adviser to growing businesses. Reach him on the Internet at eccn@vivanet.com.)

Computer & Business Show Guide

While businesspeople remain earthbound, videoconferencing today enjoys a stronghold in the corporate world. Recent innovations and price reductions have brought the technology into the realm of small businesses.
Maggie Quinn must communicate regularly from her Albany office, with branch employees in Rochester, Buffalo and Syracuse. She relies on videoconferencing to maintain face-to-face contact without driving 10 hours.
“I use videoconferencing to get the message out to all the offices. That’s the beauty of it, as opposed to traveling to four offices in two days. You can have interaction,” says Quinn, Upstate New York branch director for MCI Communications Corp., a videoconferencing provider.
“I use it at least once a month,” she says. “When we made some changes in the offices recently, we used videoconferences every day.”
Experts estimate that more than 40 percent of large corporations rely on videoconferencing to improve communication and reduce travel costs. Until recently, however, costs made videoconferencing unaffordable for small and midsize companies.
“I’m real impressed with it and the price is right,” says Mary Malaszek, owner of Market Directions, a telecommunications consulting company in Rochester. “It can really benefit a company with headquarters in one city and offices around the country.”
Many companies today almost never interact face-to-face with clients. They instead rely on telephones, fax machines and the Internet, she says. Desktop conferencing–videoconferencing using desktop computers–allows companies to interact face-to-face, without the travel costs and time.
David Weber, vice president of sales and marketing for PicturePhone Direct in Henrietta, describes the videoconferencing industry as “booming, but still in its infancy. There’s no doubt it is on the rise.” (PicturePhone Direct’s site on the World Wide Web features “The Jetsons” images and the theme song.)
Telecommunications experts extol the group-productivity benefits of videoconferencing and desktop conferencing. The attractiveness of the technology extends beyond being able to see the individual on the other end of the telephone, Weber says.
He cites two main reasons for companies to use videoconferencing: to increase productivity and to reduce travel costs.
“Voice and video are nice, but the real plus is the collaborative functions,” Weber says. Those functions include the ability of colleagues in different buildings, cities or countries to conduct meetings and work on the same project simultaneously.
Colleagues can call up a document– spreadsheets, desktop publishing, auto- cad–on the screen and make changes together through a process called “white boarding,” he says. The changes are made on a master document and downloaded to each site.
“The real advantage is the shared desktop; the fact that two people can work simultaneously on a document, spreadsheet or other application,” Weber says. “The desktop conference is faster than sending documents by fax or overnight.”
The uses of document sharing can range from helping a co-worker who does not understand materials to developing a budget for a multidivision corporation. Videoconferencing also allows traditional business meetings, planning and training without the travel time and cost.
“It allows dispersed work groups to make collective decisions and bring multiple perspectives to bear quickly on changing conditions,” Weber says.
Telecommunications experts say travel savings remain a major drawing point for videoconferencing. Features such as better communication, increased productivity and speedier business transactions add to the technology’s appeal.
Quinn agrees one major advantage of videoconferencing comes with reduced travel. Effective use of the technology can slash travel costs up to 30 percent. It also can reduce the time employees must spend away from work.
“The use of videoconferencing is increasing as the cost of travel and the time associated with travel is increasing,” Quinn says. “If you (now) travel six times a year, you can cut it down to two times. The cost of doing business is less.”
She adds: “You still need to travel once in a while. You still need true face- to-face meetings.”
For companies unsure about investing in videoconferencing equipment, Kinko’s Corp. Copy Center in East Rochester provides an alternative. It is one of 200 Kinko’s locations across the United States offering videoconferencing rooms through a venture with Sprint Corp.
Manager Craig Wilson says his business customers find the technology a vast improvement over frequent travel.
“Business owners look at it as a useful tool,” he says. “Everyone who comes in here says it’s a very effective way to work. You don’t have to spend hours and hours in an airport and an airplane.”
Videoconferencing eliminates the drive to and from the airport, parking, checking in and flying, Wilson says. The Kinko’s network allows companies to connect with clients, sales reps or agents around the country.
“The saving is tremendous compared with flying people across the country and putting them up for a night,” he says.
The cost of sending 12 people to a four-hour videoconference, roughly $1,200, is far less than flying 12 people across the country and providing accommodations.
Tony DiFlorio, president of Video Works Imaging Products in Greece, says manufacturers–the market he caters to–care less about full-motion video and more about transmitted product images. They sell systems that transmit 3-D still images over regular telephone lines.
The systems allow both ends of the conference to view, zoom in on and point to the image. Manufacturers rely on the conferences to work out problems during preproduction, he says.
“If there is a problem, oftentimes the supplier is located thousands of miles away,” he notes. “When there is a problem it can shut down the assembly line.”
Videoconferencing can help reduce downtime and product waste.
He adds that the medical field uses the same product, PhotoPhone, to transmit and simultaneously view X-rays and diagnostic tests.
“It reduces the amount of time for diagnosis. This is critical for life-and-death cases.”
Weber says desktop videoconferencing attracts all types and sizes of companies.
“Most are small to midsize businesses that couldn’t afford or staff an expensive, full-size videoconference room,” he says. “Many are companies with multiple field locations that need to update their staff.”
Common videoconferencing and desktop conferencing users include engineering and law firms, schools and corporate trainers and telecommuters.
Wilson says the videoconferencing clients at Kinko’s range from a team of Xerox Corp. engineers, who conduct planning sessions, to a local woman who interviewed nanny candidates to care for her children.
“It’s mostly business customers, but also retail consumers at Christmas, Mother’s Day and Father’s Day. Primarily, though, business to business: depositions, presentations, training courses, planning sessions,” he says.
Before purchasing or leasing conferencing equipment, experts recommend that companies determine how they will use it. Their uses will determine whether they need a full videoconferencing room or a desktop system. For example, asking 15 programmers to stand around a 15-inch PC monitor and a small video camera for a training session probably won’t work well.
The customer’s needs should determine what he or she buys, Quinn says. Desktop conferencing works best for one-to-one or one-to-two communication. Room-style videoconferencing lends itself to larger groups, such as training and multiple-employee updates.
Desktop conferencing offers lower cost and availability, but the video quality does not match larger (and more expensive) units. Images on desktop conferencing systems often appear slow and jerky. Sometimes audio and video can get out of sync.
Videoconferencing rooms offer better image quality. For example, Kinko’s video room has two full-screen, 28-inch monitors and can accommodate groups up to 12 people.
When the videoconferencing systems first hit the market a decade ago, equipment costs ranged from $80,000 to $100,000, and telecommunication links up to $1,000 an hour. The development of less-expensive equipment and digital telephone networks have reduced costs greatly. Conducting a videoconference now costs less than $40 an hour.
“Because of desktop video,” Quinn says, “it doesn’t matter if you’re a small company–you can afford it. Companies that are more aggressive and willing to try new technologies are using it. Video is very much acceptable and reliable, but it is still a new technology.”
The cost of both videoconferencing and desktop conferencing depends greatly on the type of transmission bands used and the size and type of hardware, experts say. A desktop system requires a PC desktop computer, an Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) line, a small video camera and software. A typical desktop conferencing system costs $1,000 to $2,000 per PC.
Malaszek has recommended desktop conferencing to some clients, but has found some reluctance. She expects that reluctance to wane as more businesses become comfortable with the technology.
Computer and telecommunications experts predict videoconferencing will next move to mobile communications, using cellular telephones and laptop/notebook computers. Weber says mobile conferencing still faces some compatibility, cost and functional problems.
Quinn says the move will be part of the development of the “virtual office, being accessible anytime, anywhere.” In the emerging virtual workplace, the videoconference will become the virtual meeting.
(Mike Dickinson is a Rochester-area free-lance writer.)

Computer & Business Show Guide

Telecommuting is the practice of working at home, or at a satellite location near the home, where employees use computer and telecommunications technology in lieu of traveling to a central workplace. The goal of telecommuting is to move workplaces to the most convenient location for the worker.
Because of the variety of locations and arrangements used for telecommuting, facility professionals charged with managing the workplace have been faced with a wide variety of new officing concepts and concerns. These are adding new dimensions to the field of facility management.
Generally speaking, facility management is the practice of coordinating the physical workplace with the people and the work of the organization. It integrates the principles of business administration, architecture, and the behavioral and engineering sciences into one discipline. Telecommuting is challenging facility professionals to create more flexible workplaces.
The 1990 federal Clean Air Act requires businesses that employ more than 100 people in one location to reduce their employees’ commute time by 25 percent. This can be done through car-pooling, public-transportation incentives, condensed workweeks or, the most practical and cost-effective method: telecommuting.
Companies faced with this mandate were required to submit reduction proposals in November 1994. Proposals and regulations will be adopted formally in 1996. Currently, the act requires only 11 states, including New York, to comply with this mandate. All have severe pollution and smog problems that must be addressed.
The Clean Air Act will affect at least 1.74 million people. Many companies outside the 11 heavily polluted states are taking a proactive environmental stance and encouraging employees to telecommute.
The benefits of telecommuting are abundant. The employer benefits span beyond the issue of productivity to include a larger labor pool, public relations value as a cutting-edge corporation, greater assignment flexibility, improved recruitment and retention, improved customer service, decreased absenteeism and reduced facility costs.
For example, expenditures for office and parking spaces in costly downtown locations can be reduced. Many individuals are advocating telecommuting to their managers and employers. They are enticed by the absence of commute time. An alternative to the home, the suburban satellite office also enables many people to avoid the long commute into a city location.
In addition to a reduction in commute time, a few of the benefits of telecommuting to the employee are: flexibility; dollar savings; less stress; the feeling of empowerment; fewer distractions; the chance to create better communication with management and co-workers; increased knowledge of high-technology equipment; more time to spend with family and friends; higher overall satisfaction with life; and the adventure of a whole new lifestyle. At the same time, the company also gains a great deal from this alternative work environment.
In the beginning stages of telecommuting, researchers thought that only people who were more independent in their workload would be successful candidates for such an alternative concept. Employers delegated data-entry specialists, salespeople and computer programmers as the pioneer telecommuters.
Now, the possibilities expand into even more job descriptions. Many consultants, writers, graphic artists, stock brokers and even CEOs are taking work away from the traditional office. “The Telecommuter’s Handbook” by Brad Schepp lists 75 jobs that now are considered compatible with telecommuting.
Facility managers often can recognize an ideal candidate for telecommuting and can identify the best alternative work site. In addition to discussing the possibilities with your company’s facility professional, sources such as Schepp’s book and Lis Fleming’s “The One-Commuter” offer tests that the employee can take to help evaluate if he or she would be a successful telecommuting candidate.
Telecommuting does have its disadvantages. The tendency to overwork often emerges when an individual is in a home office, not being monitored by the traditional time clock. Some people think that they lose their credibility when they telecommute. Others have noted added stress in the household when deadlines roll around.
The most commonly heard complaint from telecommuters, however, is that they feel isolated, not only from social groups but also from advancement. Telecommuters have the disadvantage of working alone in the home-based office; they must learn new ways to communicate with team members, managers and co-workers. Part of that communication means going into the office to work occasionally; many people work half the week in the traditional office and telecommute part time.
Beware: There are employees who need to remain in the traditional office. These are the people who rely heavily on clerical staff, who feel the office environment is a motivator or who simply have no work space at home.
Now it’s time to assess the resources. Telecommuters do need equipment at home. Of course, the equipment varies according to the job. This is where the facility manager plays a vital role in the telecommuting process. The facility professional can help you assess the individual situations and cater each telecommuter’s environment to meet government and corporate regulations.
Before choosing telecommuters, administrators need to verify four key areas, which must be identified, monitored and met in a positive manner for telecommuting to work:
–Do you have the right support? Is this truly beneficial to the company, and are key leaders verbally supporting the change?
–Are you rewarding the people who come up with the ideas and the managers who incorporate the change?
–You must start right. Starting right is accomplished by a combination of elements: giving the pilot participants some leeway; focusing on one or two key benefits to the organization instead of trying to solve all of the workplace problems from the start; initiating the program with a small, controlled pilot group; and making an early decision about how to publicize a pilot program. The starting process, as with all projects, requires that the person who implements the plan pay close attention to all details.
–Involve the right people: facility professionals, human resources, data processing, line management, legal and financial advisers, your boss and his or her boss and a trusted co-worker.
Now the advice is out, and you are ready to start a successful telecommuting program. The six steps to implementation are: select the job, select the people, train the manager, train the telecommuters, link the telecommuter to the office, and take care of technical details. Your company’s facility professional will be the best source for overseeing the technical details of the implementation process.
Remember that telecommuting is an ongoing commitment. If the program works, then the news will spread and others will want to be part of an alternative work environment. If there are problems with the pilot program, telecommuters and managers must assess the problem, fix it and then decide if it is worth continuing it.
So what does the future hold for telecommuting? Is it a fad or a change in modern society? The telecommuting trend already has forced planners and managers to re- evaluate the traditional notion of the office. How will this affect the workplace of tomorrow? The reality of a universal work space is already here.
The traditional workplace boundaries have been removed due to concepts such as telecommuting. It is this kind of concept that is paving the way to tomorrow’s workplace.
(Jacqueline A. Marsh is president of the Capital District Chapter of the International Facilities Management Association. The Houston, Texas-based association is made up of facility practitioners nationwide. This article first appeared in the Capital District Business Review, an affiliated publication in Albany.)

Computer & Business Show Guide

The company found the newest design idea in office environments: Personal Harbors.
Designed by Grand Rapids-based Steelcase Inc., Personal Harbors are self-enclosed, mobile offices that provide workers with 60 square feet of desk space, shelves, drawers and electrical power sources.
Xerox recently purchased 12 of the units for its corporate research and technology division. The units are for use by people who work in different divisions but who must come to the Webster site for certain projects, spokeswoman Charlene Stephens said.
“We’ll be using them for unique situations, for people who don’t require large work space,” she says.
The Personal Harbors unit is one of two self-enclosed office pods designed to maximize productivity and performance in minimal space. The second type of unit is called the Clipper. Designed by New Space, a subsidiary of Fort Worth- based Gilbert International Inc., the Clipper more resembles a cocoon.
Personal Harbors
Personal Harbors are designed to be used in groups. When assembled in one room or area, they should encircle the room, leaving a center area for common use and meetings.
The concept is similar to how wagon trains of the Old West would circle up for the night. The office unit gives the user access to personal, private space, like the wagons; a center area–like the camp fire–is readily available for meetings and brainstorming sessions.
It is ideal for creative processes where people must work in teams or on projects together, says Peter Jeff, Steelcase spokesman.
“Everyone says creativity has to happen in a team environment,” he says. “The opposite side of that is that in order for people to recharge their batteries, they need quiet time. What you have is a safe harbor, a combination of the privacy and the connectedness of the team.”
Companies like the idea of saving space while having team areas, Jeff says. An average office is about 8-by-10, or 80 square feet. The Personal Harbor is 48 square feet.
The concept works for teams, where hierarchy and office sizes can cause problems. Steelcase also has found that it’s those on the lower end of the ladder who need more space, Jeff says.
“The model in corporate America is the greater the status, the greater the space you need,” he says. “We’re saying the opposite is true. A clerical worker needs a whole lot more space than a CEO.”
The Personal Harbor unit was first previewed in 1992, but its launch did not take place until the following year. Steelcase says the unit boasts three unique features:
–highly private space;
–semipublic areas and group tables; and
–a range of tools included that allow the teams to work on any project.
The units retail at roughly $7,000 apiece. Jeff says the price is comparable to standard office furniture: desk, chair, filing cabinets and shelves.
The Clipper
The Clipper differs from Personal Harbors in several ways. First, the user cannot stand up inside and instead relies on a seat mounted to a track to move forward and back in the unit. Sitting in the unit feels like driving; the outside resembles a spacecraft.
Once users get past the unit’s appearance, they immediately realize its advantages, says Margaret Sevadjian, president of New Space.
“So many of the companies recognize they’ve got to use their space better,” she says. “They’re also recognizing people are working out of their homes, hotelling and working as teams.”
The unit features hidden drawers and shelves inside its walls, full electrical hookups, and variable lighting and air. Windows on the door and side open and close for accessibility.
The Clipper is very mobile. After hailstorms caused millions of dollars in damages in the Fort Worth area, Sevadjian says she received several calls from insurance agencies who needed to set up disaster offices.
“(Clippers) have telephones in there and they can just roll them in and plug them in,” she says.
Companies also are finding uses for the unit as a study office or as a place for employees to train and study outside of a library.
Users report that although they thought they would not like an enclosed space, because the unit is light and the sides are angled, it allows a feeling of openness, Sevadjian says.
The Clipper’s list price is $6,000, before shipping. Air and light packages are an additional $325 each; a leather seat is $300 extra.
Acceptance
How either unit will be accepted by the business community remains to be seen. Both are still seen as radical changes from the standard office environment, says Paul Murrett, sales manager at Buffalo’s William H. Prentice Inc. Office Environments, which sells both the Personal Harbor and Clipper.
“The Clipper has been very well- received, but it’s a little too leading- edge,” he says. “(Customers are) intrigued by what is represented and what it could represent in an office.”
Other now-standard office environments, like cubicles, once were thought of as nouveau and strange, Murrett notes.
“It’s now the norm–but was once thought of as a rat cage,” he says. “When they came on the scene in the ’70s, people were very reluctant to go into them and give up their offices and doors and names on those doors.”
The best way to encourage acceptance of the units or any changed office environment is to allow employees to take part in the decision-making process, says Arlene Paul, a space planning and design consultant with Arlene Paul & Associates Inc. in suburban Buffalo.
“Anytime you initiate a change in an office environment, there’s going to be resistance,” she says. “If you allow people to be part of the process of finding the solution, they’re more apt (to accept it).”
Paul sees a sort of contradiction, however. The enclosed office units were created as a solution to a problem that hasn’t necessarily been defined yet, she says.
“They’re creating a product you can take into an environment and have the way people work conformed,” Paul says. “They’re trying to drive with their product the way people are working rather than going into an (existing) office environment and making it work.”
But manufacturers argue that productivity rises among users. And it helps solve the problem of keeping a lid on office rates.
“You’re utilizing the same space an 8-by-10 office took, but maximizing the space,” Jeff says. “Customers see the value of that. That’s what they’re paying for, the enhanced work process.
(Tracey Rosenthal Drury is a reporter for Business First of Buffalo, an affiliated publication.)

Computer & Business Show Guide

But if you really want to make it easier for your customers to get information about you and from you quickly, remember that they’re more likely to have access to a facsimile machine than to a high-speed node on the Internet.
Using a technology known as “fax-on-demand,” you can, in fact, put those customer fax machines to work for you.
It is a great way to make a lot of information conveniently available to a lot of people–and to do so in a non-intrusive way that lets your customers control what kind of information they get from you, and when.
Fax-on-demand technology allows you to store most any kind of document– product literature, price lists, order forms, briefing papers, brochures or whatever–in a kind of computerized library.
Your customers can have copies of those documents faxed to them whenever they want. They do not have to write away for anything, or talk to anybody. They simply dial up your fax-on-demand system, follow a few simple instructions, and get the information they need from you–immediately.
You may have encountered this technology in dealing with large, sophisticated, high-technology companies like IBM Corp. which use it heavily to distribute product literature and other information.
But what you may not realize is that it’s well within reach for smaller businesses, as well. Take the Business Council of New York State Inc., a 62-employee association based in Albany. The Business Council acquired fax-on-demand as an inexpensive add-on to a voice-mail system. We did not go looking for fax-on-demand, but once available, the council found it was an excellent and cost-effective tool for getting information to its members and to others involved in its work.
In its most basic form, fax-on-demand requires a properly equipped computer that can store the images of your documents, and then can send copies out to fax numbers on request. The precise way the documents get online in the first place varies from system to system. The Business Council, for example, can simply “fax” the documents to the computer. More important than the technology, though, are:
–the care and thought that go into preparing the documents you put on the system;
–the success you have in promoting the availability of the service to your customers; and
–the effort you make to ensure that the system is easy and understandable for your customers, is properly promoted to them, and contains only the most up-to- date and accurate information.
At the Business Council, dozens of documents are put on the system every month — its positions on bills before the state Legislature, for example, or news releases from the Assembly or from the governor’s office, or updates on member benefit programs and registration forms for seminars. Currently, it averages about 5,300 requests for documents each year. The telephone number for the service is published in its newsletters and other mailings to members, as well as document numbers for specific pieces of information.
To use the Business Council’s system, all a member need do is dial that number from the handset of a fax machine, follow the recorded instructions to punch in the number of the document desired, and the transmission begins immediately. Some other systems allow the customer to call from one phone, and then have the system transmit to a fax machine at a different number.
If you’re not sure about the number of the document you want, the system can fax you an index; the recorded instructions tell you how.
The basic cost of the equipment needed is minimal–and the phone call is on the customer. The main cost is the time involved in loading the material into the system and in keeping track of it. But at the Business Council that has been more than offset by time saved, because we no longer have to handle as many requests for information in person and by mail. And the volume and quality of information available to the member is much greater.
Here are a few other pointers to keep in mind if you decide to implement a fax-on-demand system:
–Pay attention to details. This system will become an important point of contact with your customers; and because it’s automated, their tolerance for missteps will be lower. The instructions must be simple and clear, and the information online must be useful, relevant and up-to-date.
Oh, yes, and check constantly to be sure that the document numbers in the system really do match the document numbers you give your customers in the index.
–The easier your system is to use, the less secure it is. The easiest-to-use systems are going to be open to anybody. Do not put anything on the system that you would not want your competitors to see. You can build in passwords and other systems that allow you to protect material, but that also makes it harder for your customers to use.
–And pay careful attention to what the online documents are going to look like when the customer gets them. Not everything looks great when it has been faxed. That nice two-color brochure might be a hit when you mail it out, but it may become one big blur when faxed. Try it; fax it to yourself before you inflict it on your customers.
Do it right, and fax-on-demand will let you communicate with your customers in the way they want.
(David Shaffer is corporate secretary of the Business Council of New York State Inc., a statewide business advocacy group based in Albany.)

Computer & Business Show Guide

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 31, 1995

11:30 A.M. – 12:30 P.M.

“MOTIVATING EMPLOYEES THROUGH RECOGNITION &
REWARDS”
Which incentives motivate what type of people? How do you decide which products will capture their attention? Learn a step-by-step approach that you can put into practice immediately to help you choose the best incentives for your audience!
Presented by: Value Marketing
Mr. Dan Davis, 716/272-0615
Cascade Room A

“SECURITY ON THE
WORLD WIDE WEB”
A presentation on the present and future of secure applications on the Internet.
Presented by: Netscape Communications,
Mr. Irwin Glenn
Frontier Corp.,
Ms. Maureen Goodwin, 716/777-4784
Cascade Room B

1:00 P.M. – 2:00 P.M.

“MULTIMEDIA SOLUTIONS FOR EMPLOYEE COMMUNICATIONS”
Investigate how Target Vision’s multimedia networks are used to instantly distribute corporate news and information to TVs and PCs throughout an organization. Session will also focus on trends and strategies used by major corporations to improve their communication efforts for better bottom-line results.
Presented by: Target Vision
Mr. Tim Detota, 716/248-0550
Cascade Room A

“HOW TO PUT YOUR BUSINESS ON THE WORLD WIDE WEB”
VivaNet is presenting seminars on the Internet for companies that want
to explore marketing on the World
Wide Web. The seminar will highlight web page development, along with the creation of interactive web forms for online ordering, marketing feedback or lead generation for potential customers.
Presented by: Vivatron Corp./VivaNet
Mr. David Wolf/Mr. Gordon Griffin,
716/475-1610
Cascade Room B

“MICROSOFT OFFICE MAGIC”
Helpful hints and quick tips for
optimizing your PC and Microsoft Office.
Presented by: Technical Learning
Center Inc.
Ms. Jennelle Torrey, 716/671-6989
Cascade Room C

2:30 P.M. – 3:30 P.M.

“MULTIMEDIA IN HOME AND SCHOOL EDUCATION”
Overview of how multimedia-based educational and edutainment software can be utilized in the home and school educational settings.
Presented by: Technical Learning
Center Inc.
Mr. John Elberfeld, 716/671-6989
Cascade Room C

4:00 P.M. – 5:00 P.M.

“VOICE RECOGNITION”
Presenting the latest technology available for voice-to-text dictation systems.
Presented by: Wilmac Co.
Mr. John O’Leary, 716/454-1160
Cascade Room A

“EXPLORING THE INTERNET”
Helpful discussion of how to get on the information superhighway and what you can do once you’re online.
Presented by: Technical Learning
Center Inc.
Mr. Steve Banks, 716/671-6989
Cascade Room C

TO BE HELD DURING
ALL SHOW HOURS

“ROCHESTER PROJECTORAMA”
Exciting comparison of large-screen computer projection systems, using latest 3 gun and LCD technology!
Presented by: Business Methods Inc.
Mr. Terry Kirchoff, 716/427-2222
Room 103A

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 1, 1995

11:00 A.M. – 12:00 P.M.

“UNLOCK THE POWER–
COMPUTER TRAINING IS THE KEY”
This seminar will walk you through the options for computer training: public vs. private training and standard vs. custom-tailored programs. We will examine the steps you can take to maximize your
training dollars and how to ensure that your company has a successful training program.
Presented by: Logical Operations Inc.
Mr. Harvey Feldstein, 716/224-7565
Cascade Room A

“VOICE RECOGNITION–
SAVE MONEY, SAVE TIME”
See how voice recognition can save your company money and time.
Presented by: Voila Technology Inc.
Mr. Terry Martin, 716/321-1451
Cascade Room B

11:30 A.M. – 12:30 P.M.

“TELEMAGIC FOR WINDOWS CONTACT MANAGEMENT & SALES AUTOMATION”
Learn how TeleMagic can provide your business with a tremendous amount of information from business contacts, clients and customers. Also provide more to order history and credit information. TeleMagic logically places data where you need it, by using multiple levels of information. There will be a live demonstration of the new TeleMagic Professional 1.0 and TeleMagic Enterprise 1.5. Also included will be the announcement of the release of Enterprise 2.0 and the new features.
Presented by: HighTech Computer Solutions
Mr. Scott Hildreth, 716/334-6394
Cascade Room D

12:00 P.M. – 1:00 P.M.

“SPEAK TO THE NOVELL EXPERT”
Jean Jackson, along with Tom Palomaki
and Theresa Lowe from Novell Inc., will demonstrate their “Groupwise” package. In today’s fast-paced world, communicating with the office has never been more important. Groupwise is an e-mail, scheduling and task management system which allows users on the network to access their e-mail anyplace, anytime.
–Besides Groupwise, visitors to the show will have a chance to talk directly to Novell experts and address Novell and networking questions they may have.
Presented by: Dox Electronics
Mr. Larry Meister, 716/544-3610
Highland Room B

1:00 P.M. – 2:00 P.M.

“BEYOND YOUR BANK: CREATIVE FINANCING FOR THE ’90s”
Alternative methods for financing business growth through equipment leasing and accounts receivable financing.
Presented by: Patora Leasing Corp.
Mr. Timothy Henderson, 716/223-1450
Cascade Room A

“HOW TO PUT YOUR BUSINESS ON THE WORLD WIDE WEB”
VivaNet is presenting seminars on the Internet for companies that want to explore marketing on the World Wide Web. The seminar will highlight web page development, along with the creation of interactive web forms for online ordering, marketing feedback or lead generation for potential customers.
Presented by: Vivatron Corp./VivaNet
Mr. David Wolf/Mr. Gordon Griffin
716/475-1610
Cascade Room B

“MULTIMEDIA SOLUTIONS FOR EMPLOYEE COMMUNICATIONS”
Investigate how Target Vision’s multimedia networks are used to instantly distribute corporate news and information to TVs and PCs throughout an organization. Session will also focus on trends and strategies used by major corporations to improve their communication efforts for better bottom-line results.
Presented by: Target Vision
Mr. Tim Detota, 716/248-0550
Cascade Room D

“MICROSOFT OFFICE MAGIC”
Helpful hints and quick tips for optimizing your PC and Microsoft Office.
Presented by: Technical Learning
Center Inc.
Ms. Jennelle Torrey, 716/671-6989
Cascade Room C

“REMOTE COMPUTER ACCESS”
Citrix Systems has developed two unique remote access products: WinView (OS/2 based) and WinFrame (NT based). What makes these products unique is the ability to run Windows in a remote-control mode via a modem with amazing performance. With WinView, up to 10 people can simultaneously dial into a Pentium-based computer to access their network applications located at the office.
–A salesperson on the road can access the network to place an order, verify inventory or check their e-mail. A parent can stay at home with an ill child and still be a part of the team. Executives can be out of town at important meetings and be aware of critical events occurring at the office. Whether at home, on a sales trip or on vacation employees can be efficient and keep in touch with the office.
Presented by: Dox Electronics
Mr. Larry Meister, 716/544-3610
Highland Room B

2:00 P.M. – 3:00 P.M.

“THE FUTURE IS NOW–AT HOME!”
Demonstration of practical applied advances in technology.
Presented by: Greater Rochester Project for Interactive Multimedia
Mr. Art Maurer, 716/777-6153
Highland Room F

2:30 P.M. – 3:30 P.M.

“FRAME RELAY–VOICE AND DATA”
Presentation by RGdata on how businesses can dramatically reduce communication costs through Frame Relay for handling day-to-day voice and data needs between remote sites.
Presented by: RGdata Inc.
Ms. Debra Giese, 716/424-7500, ext. 232
Cascade Room A

“MULTIMEDIA IN HOME AND SCHOOL EDUCATION”
Overview of how multimedia-based educational and edutainment software can be utilized in the home and school educational settings.
Presented by: Technical Learning
Center Inc.
Mr. John Elberfeld, 716/671-6989
Cascade Room C

“MICROSOFT WINDOWS NT/95 MIGRATION ISSUES”
Overview of NT/95 and then delve into migration issues of each. Which product should be used to fill user requirements.
Presented by: Information
Technologists Inc.
Mr. Paul Shiffer, 716/244-4260
Cascade Room B

3:00 P.M. – 4:00 P.M.

“CONSIDERATIONS FOR SELECTING A MANUFACTURING SOFTWARE SYSTEM”
Elements to be considered when upgrading
a manufacturing system. Things to be considered: resource allocation, product configurators, rate base and DRP.

Presented by: QBC Systems Inc.
Mr. Patrick McGovern Jr., 716/691-5201
Cascade Room D

4:00 P.M. – 5:00 P.M.

“EXPLORING THE INTERNET”
Helpful discussion of how to get on the information superhighway and what you can do once you’re online.
Presented by: Technical Learning
Center Inc.
Mr. Steve Banks, 716/671-6989
Cascade Room C

TO BE HELD DURING
ALL SHOW HOURS

“ROCHESTER PROJECTORAMA”
Exciting comparison of large-screen computer projection systems, using latest 3 gun and LCD technology!
Presented by: Business Methods Inc.
Mr. Terry Kirchoff, 716/427-2222
Room 103A

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1995

11:30 A.M. – 12:30 P.M.

“FUTURE TECHNOLOGIES & WIRELESS PBX FOR BUSINESSES”
Explanation and demonstration on future cellular technologies and wireless PBX for corporate users.
Presented by: Cellular One Genesee Telephone Co.
Ms. Maureen Kurz, 716/292-6300,
ext. 6661
Cascade Room D

1:00 P.M. – 2:00 P.M.

“HOW TO PUT YOUR BUSINESS ON THE WORLD WIDE WEB”
VivaNet is presenting seminars on the Internet for companies that want to explore marketing on the World Wide Web. The seminar will highlight web page development, along with the creation of interactive web forms for online ordering, marketing feedback or lead generation for potential customers.
Presented by: Vivatron Corp./VivaNet
Mr. David Wolf/Mr. Gordon Griffin,
716/475-1610
Cascade Room B

“MULTIMEDIA SOLUTIONS FOR EMPLOYEE COMMUNICATIONS”
Investigate how Target Vision’s multimedia networks are used to instantly distribute corporate news and information to TVs and PCs throughout an organization. Session will also focus on trends and strategies used by major corporations to improve their communication efforts for better bottom-line results.
Presented by: Target Vision
Mr. Tim Detota, 716/248-0550
Cascade Room D

TO BE HELD DURING
ALL SHOW HOURS

“ROCHESTER PROJECTORAMA”
Exciting comparison of large-screen computer projection systems, using latest 3 gun and LCD technology!
Presented by: Business Methods Inc.
Mr. Terry Kirchoff, 716/427-2222
Room 103A

Computer & Business Show Guide

EXHIBITOR BOOTH NUMBER(S)

ABRA SOFTWARE/BUSINESS TECHNOLOGY 0317
ADT SECURITY SYSTEMS 0214
APICS/AMERICAN PRODUCTION & INVENTORY 0304
ADVANCED BUSINESS MACHINES INC. 0516
ADVANCED IMAGE MANAGEMENT INC. 0708
ALTERNATIVE PERSONAL SOFTWARE 0113, 0115, 0117
AMERICAN POWER CONVERSION 0417
AMERICAN TONER & CARTRIDGE 0405
AMHERST BINDING & LAMINATING 0206
AMICRON TECHNOLOGY SERVICES 0319
AMPLICON FINANCIAL 0817
APPLIED DIGITAL SYSTEMS INC. 0413
ASPIRE MAGAZINE/LARQUE PUBLICATIONS 0814
ASSOCIATION OF INFORMATION & IMAGE MGT. 0205
AUSTECH DEVELOPMENT INC. 0721
BB ENTERPRISES 0917
BIEL’S INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SYSTEMS 0617
BODINE UNLIMITED TOURS 0816
BOOKWARE 0906, 0908
BORDERS BOOKS & MUSIC 0514
BOTANICUS 0112
BROWN & BIGELOW INC. 0220
BRYANT & STRATTON COMPUTER TRAINING 0414
BUFFALO AUDIO VISUAL SERVICES 0813
BUSINESS METHODS INC. 0533
C.H. MORSE STAMP CO. 0717
CARIS NETWORK SOLUTIONS 0209
CELLULAR ONE GENESEE TELEPHONE CO. 0401
CHASE MANHATTAN BANK N.A. 0821
CHROMAGEN INC. 0706
CITIBANK (NEW YORK STATE) 0716
COFFEE PAUSE 0316
COMPLETE PAYROLL PROCESSING 0221
COMPUTER AFFILIATES 0315
DARTNELL ENTERPRISES INC. 0400
DATA PROCESSING MGT. ASSOC. 0818
DATA SET CABLE 0520
DATRON COMPUTER PRODUCTS/MCSI 0420
DEAN WITTER REYNOLDS 0312
DEFT COMPUTER SOLUTIONS 0608
DELAWARE AUDIO VISUAL 0204
DEMOCRAT AND CHRONICLE/TIMES-UNION 0515
DESIGN BY RAS 0306
DIGICHROME INC. 0808
DIGITAL DESIGN SOLUTIONS INC. 0300
DOCKSIDE INTERNET SERVICES 0307
DOX ELECTRONICS INC. 0333
E-ZNET INC. 0330
EASTERN COPY PRODUCTS INC. 0501
ERGONOMIC SOLUTIONS AT WORK 0404
ERGOTRON INC. 0620
EXTRA HELP STAFFING SERVICES 0409
F.F. TRONIXS 0301
FLOWER CITY PAGING 0215
FORTUNE MAGAZINE 0900
FRANCIS AUDIO VISUAL SERVICES 0108, 0110 FROG COMPUTER SOCIETY 0905
FRONTIER CORP. 0523
GBC-VELOBIND 0701
GOLF HOLIDAYS 0913
HAHN GRAPHIC 0415
HARMON & SULLIVAN ASSOC. INC. 0421
HIGHTECH COMPUTER SOLUTIONS 0506
ITA INC. 0911
IMAGE OFFICE EQUIPMENT 0213
IMAGING RECHARGERS INC. 0804
INDATA SYSTEMS 0100, 0102
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGIES INC. 0208
INTEGRATED CABELING SYSTEMS 0712
IRONDEQUOIT MOTION EQUIPMENT/IME 0606
KEY QUICKPRINT 0709
LEXMARK 0420
LIT-PAC 0802
LOGICAL OPERATIONS INC. 0517
LOWRY COMPUTER PRODUCTS 0320
M2 TECHNOLOGIES 0109
MLS ON-LINE 0202
MAC SHACK 0105
MAP WORKS 0106
MELIORA SYSTEMS INC. 0715
MEMORANDOM 0217
MEMOTEC DATACOM INC. 0820
METEX SYSTEMS INC. 0819
MICROLYTICS INC. 0321
MONROE COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF
ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES 0904
MONY ROCHESTER ASSOCIATES 0408
MORGAN HILL 0412
NETACCESS INC. 0719
NETCORP 0318
NEW HORIZONS COMPUTER LEARNING CENTER 0800
OFFICE EXPRESS 0700
OFFICE MAX 0507
PCR PERSONAL COMPUTER RENTAL 0604
PSC INC. 0521
PAGE NEW YORK 0512
PAGENET 0704
PAINE WEBBER INC. 0513
PATORA LEASING CORP. 0309
PAYCHEX INC. 0509
PRODUCTIVITY POINT INTERNATIONAL 0613
PROFESSIONAL GRAPHICS 0500
PRODIGY SERVICES CO. TBA
PROTEC MICROSYSTEMS INC. 0705
QBC SYSTEMS 0707
RG DATA INC. 0201
RL KISTLER INC. 0720
RTE CORPORATE BARTER GROUP 0714
REAL TIME ENTERPRISES INC. 0614
ROCHESTER BUSINESS JOURNAL 0505
ROCHESTER COPIER 0801
ROCHESTER FREE-NET 0807
ROCHESTER INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 0216
ROCHESTER PUBLIC ACCESS 0621
S.R. BACHER ELECTRIC CORP. 0816
SCHNEIDER DATA CONSULTANTS 0615
SECURITRONICS 0308
SECURITY PRODUCTS 0406
SERVICE TECH INC. 0508
SERVICELAND COMPUTER SERVICES 0901
SIMPLEX TIME RECORDER CO. 0407
SOCIETY FOR TECHNICAL COMMUNICATION 0103
SOFT SYS INC. 0107
STRESS TECHNOLOGY INC. 0805
SUPERIOR TEMPORARY SERVICES INC. 0612
SYSPRO IMPACT SOFTWARE INC. 0809
TAD RESOURCES INTERNATIONAL INC. 0713
TARGET VISION 0539
TECHNICAL LEARNING CENTER INC. 0601, 0605
THANX PRODUCTS 0703
TIME WARNER CELLULAR 0616
TOWN OF OAKVILLE ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT 0212
VALUE MARKETING 0305
VIRTUAL ARTS 0909
VIVANET 0600
VIVATRON CORP. 0602
VOILA TECHNOLOGY INC. 0218
VORDEX INC. 0313
WYNIT INC. 0609
WESCO 0101
WILCOMP COMPUTER SYSTEMS INTEGRATORS 0504
WILMAC CO. 0812
WRITE WOMAN COMPUTER PRODUCTS INC. 0733
YOH INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ASSOCIATES 0219
Information is current as of Oct. 20

x

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