This Week
  • CFO David Klein is leader of the financial team at Constellation Brands.

  • CEO Eric Converse has VirtualScopics on the verge of generating cash.

  • MaeTec Power Inc. began as a part-time operation in 2003.

  • Renovations of buildings downtown are helping to give new life to the center city.

  • Mirror Show Management grabbed the top spot on the 2015 Rochester Top 100.

  • Liz Madison is bringing the farm to doorsteps across Wayne and Monroe counties.

Report: N.Y. ranks 38th in energy efficiency

Rochester Business Journal
July 14, 2014

New York ranks among the most expensive states for energy bills, a new report from WalletHub shows.

WalletHub—a social website launched by Evolution Finance that offers financial tools and information for consumers and small-business owners—ranked New York 38th among the 50 states and District of Columbia based on energy efficiency. The report, 2014’s Most & Least Energy-Expensive States, looked at six key metrics, including electricity cost, consumption, natural gas prices and fuel prices.

New Yorkers average $365 a month in energy costs, including electricity costs of $126 and natural gas costs of $80. Drivers pay some $160 a month for gasoline, on average.

The least expensive state for energy costs is Colorado, where residents average $301 total, including $83 a month in electricity costs. The most expensive state is Hawaii at $451 a month in energy costs. Hawaiians average $209 monthly in electricity costs and $163 for gasoline.

North Dakota residents pay the least for electricity, while Hawaiians pay the most. The lowest natural gas prices are in Colorado and the lowest fuel prices can be found in South Carolina.

notes that in the U.S. some 7.1 percent of the average consumer’s total income is spent on energy costs.

(c) 2014 Rochester Business Journal. To obtain permission to reprint this article, call 585-546-8303 or e-mail

What You're Saying 

Frank Regan at 9:19:14 AM on 7/15/2014
If it’s true that New York ranks among the most expensive states for energy bills, then it’s the wrong metric.

If the only way you measure energy cost is by using energy bills then you don’t see a lot of things. You don’t see fossil fuels warming up the planet. You d...  Read More >

Post Your Own Comment


Not registered? Sign up now!

To Do   Text Size
Post CommentPost A Comment eMail Size1
View CommentsView All Comments PrintPrint Size2
ReprintsReprints Size3
  • E-mailed
  • Commented
  • Viewed
RBJ   Google